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In my Android app I need to know when the MapView zooming process has been finished. There is no built in solution for that, so I had the idea to override dispatchDraw.

dispatchDraw is being invoked as long as the Map is zooming (as well as as one scrolls on the Map, but this doesn't matter) and my idea is to continuously check if dispatchDraw is invoked by overwriting a variable called dispatchDrawInvoked. When the zoom on the MapView is being invoked the first time (that means when the zooming process begins), I start a new thread which continuously set dispatchDrawInvoked every second to false. The idea is that the dispatchDraw method overwrites dispatchDrawInvoked with true a lot of times within this second and when the second is over and dispatchDraw is still true, it means that zooming isn't finished yet. In most cases the zooming is finished and the dispatchDraw stays false, after the loop runs a second time, so it takes at minimum 2 seconds. When the loop recognizes that the zoom process is finished, I set the zooming variable to true to signal (to upper classes who need to know that) that zooming is finished.

So far so good. The problem is, this whole implementation doesn't behave concurrent. It behaves sequential and the MapView gets stuck for 2 seconds. Why is this so, please see my code:

public class ZoomListeningMapView extends MapView {
    private final static String TAG = ZoomListeningMapView.class.getSimpleName();

    private final static int DEFAULT_ZOOM_LEVEL = 14;
    private int lastZoomLevel = DEFAULT_ZOOM_LEVEL;
    private volatile boolean zooming = false;
    private volatile boolean dispatchDrawInvoked = false;

    public ZoomListeningMapView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        super(context, attrs);
    }

    public ZoomListeningMapView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
        super(context, attrs, defStyle);
    }

    public ZoomListeningMapView(Context context, String apiKey) {
        super(context, apiKey);
    }

    public boolean isZooming() {
        return zooming;
    }

    public static int getDefaultZoomLevel() {
        return DEFAULT_ZOOM_LEVEL;
    }

    @Override
    protected void dispatchDraw(Canvas canvas) {
        super.dispatchDraw(canvas);

        dispatchDrawInvoked = true;

        Log.i(TAG, "setting dispatchDrawInvoked to true");
        Log.i(TAG, "zooming:" + zooming);

        if (getZoomLevel() != lastZoomLevel) {
            lastZoomLevel = getZoomLevel();

            Log.i(TAG, "zoom level changed");

            zooming = true;

            Log.i(TAG, "zooming:" + zooming);

            new Thread(new ZoomRunnable()).start();
        }
    }

    private class ZoomRunnable implements Runnable {

        private final String TAG = ZoomRunnable.class.getSimpleName();

        @Override
        public void run() {
            try {
                while (zooming)  {
                    dispatchDrawInvoked = false;

                    Log.i(TAG, "setting dispatchDrawInvoked to false");

                    Thread.sleep(1000);

                    if (dispatchDrawInvoked == false)  {
                        zooming = false;

                        Log.i(TAG, "dispatchDrawInvoked is still false, so Map zooming is finished.");
                    }
                }
            } 
            catch (InterruptedException e) {
                Log.e(TAG, "InterruptedException: " + e.getMessage());

                return;
            }
        }
    }
}

This is the log which is always the same. It shows that there is no concurrency:

Log

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A Runnable does not take care of creating and executing on a thread, it simply provides the run() method that a thread will execute when started. So you're just calling the run() method synchronously. You need to actually use something that will start another thread.

new Thread(new MapThread()).start()

will take care of what you intend, but you should rename MapThread since it's actually just a runnable and I recommend becoming familiar with Handlers and HandlerThreads if you intend on posting a lot of runnables and don't want to make a thread for every one.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works (after I had to make some modifications to the run method). And I renamed MapThread to ZoomRunnable. –  Bevor Feb 8 '13 at 15:20

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