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This is a follow-on from my question regarding multiple catch blocks How to deal with returning an object and handling errors

My updated code is below, however I'm getting an error that my draw() method must return an int, is there any way to make the compiler recognise that endOfDeck() will return an int, thus fulfilling the return requirements? (see "return endOfDeck())

Any smarter way to accomplish this?

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.ListIterator;
/**
 * @author L
 *
*/
public abstract class Deck 
{

private ArrayList<Card> cards;
private ListIterator<Card> deckPosition = cards.listIterator();
private Card lastDrawn;
/**
 * 
 */
public Deck() 
{   
}

public int draw()
{

    try
    {
        if(deckPosition.hasNext())
        {
            lastDrawn = deckPosition.next();
            return 1;
        }
        else if(cards.isEmpty())
        {
            throw new EmptyDeckException();
        }
        else
        {
            throw new EndOfDeckException();
        }
    }

    catch(EmptyDeckException e)
    {
        emptyDeck();
        return 0;
    }
    catch(EndOfDeckException e)
    {
        return endOfDeck();

    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        System.out.println("Exception when drawing a card, check try/catch block in draw() method of Card");
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

}

public abstract int endOfDeck();
public abstract void emptyDeck();

}
share|improve this question
    
What should be your default return value? In case all shit happens? REturn that in ur final catch block –  smk Feb 7 '13 at 20:43
3  
Don't use exceptions for control flow. Instead of throwing an EmptyDeckException and then dealing with it later on, just address that case directly there. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 7 '13 at 20:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your last catch block does not have any return statement: -

catch(Exception e)
    {
        System.out.println("Exception when drawing a card, check try/catch block in draw() method of Card");
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

So, your method will not return any value, if that catch block is executed. May be you can return any integer denoting the exception, or wrap the exception in a RuntimeException and rethrow it.


But, your code seems somewhat problematic. You are throwing exception unnecessarily. Whatever you are doing in the catch block, you can do directly in your if-else blocks.

So, you can modify your code to: -

    try {
        if(deckPosition.hasNext())
        {
            lastDrawn = deckPosition.next();
            return 1;
        }
        else if(cards.isEmpty())
        {
            emptyDeck();
            return 0;
        }
        else
        {
            // throw new EndOfDeckException();  // Don't throw it
            return endOfDeck();
        }

    } catch(Exception e) {
        /** Also, if possible, replace this catch block with the one catching
            more specific exception than all the `Exceptions` **/
        System.out.println("Exception when drawing a card, check try/catch block in draw() method of Card");
        throw new RuntimeException("Exception drawing a card");
    }
share|improve this answer
    
facepalm thanks, I seem to have had a homer simpson moment –  LinuxN00b Feb 7 '13 at 20:48
    
@LinuxN00b.. You're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Feb 7 '13 at 20:50
    
Also if I use your suggested method to throw a new RuntimeException how does this work with the return statement? Just waiting to accept your answer, thanks for the help –  LinuxN00b Feb 7 '13 at 20:53
    
@LinuxN00b.. If the exception you got cannot be recovered from. i.e, you don't want to continue, in case you got some exception, then rather than return any arbitrary integer, you can wrap the exception in a RuntimException, which is an unchecked exception, and hence should not be handled. In which case, your program will halt, giving your appropriate exception message. –  Rohit Jain Feb 7 '13 at 20:55
    
@LinuxN00b.. So, basically, from a method intended to return a value, you either return the desired type of value, or you can throw an exception, that denotes the abnormal termination of that method. –  Rohit Jain Feb 7 '13 at 20:56

Your bottom catch must return an int to satisfy all code paths.

catch(Exception e)
    {
        System.out.println("Exception when drawing a card, check try/catch block in draw() method of Card");
        e.printStackTrace();
        // Return needs to be here.
    }

or, you need to add a default return value at the bottom of the method.

share|improve this answer
    
Just answered at the same time :/ guess I was short on the draw... –  justderb Feb 7 '13 at 20:46

When a method is declared as returning something you have to make sure that every path of execution through the method results in an (uncaught) exception getting propagated to the caller or a value being returned.

Your statement return endOfDeck() is perfectly fine, but you have a code path that still doesn't return:

catch(Exception e)
    {
        System.out.println("Exception when drawing a card, check try/catch block in draw() method of Card");
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

If this case occurs then there's noting the compiler can return.

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