Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am doing a project using MySQL 5. The requirement is the following:

Give the user names, device types, OS version and fruit involved in picks, where users had the same device type, were running iOS 4 or 4.1, and picked the same fruit

The relevant tables are as follows:

User: {uID: INT, name: VARCHAR(45), deviceOS: VARCHAR(45), deviceType: VARCHAR(45)}

Pick: {uID: INT, ts: TIMESTAMP, fruit: VARCHAR(45)}

(Primary keys in bold. uID in Pick is a foreign key of uID in User.)

I am doing the following query:

SELECT DISTINCT NAME1, OS1, DEV1, NAME2, OS2, DEV2, P1.fruit FROM Pick AS P1, Pick AS P2, 

(SELECT U1.uID AS User1, U1.name AS NAME1, U1.deviceOS AS OS1, U1.deviceType AS DEV1, 
        U2.uID AS User2, U2.name AS NAME2, U2.deviceOS AS OS2, U2.deviceType AS DEV2
FROM User AS U1, User AS U2 
WHERE (U1.uID != U2.uID) AND
      (U1.deviceType = U2.deviceType) AND
      (U1.deviceOS = "4" OR U1.deviceOS = "4.1") AND
      (U2.deviceOS = "4" OR U2.deviceOS = "4.1")) AS PartialResult

WHERE (P1.uID = PartialResult.User1) AND
      (P2.uID = PartialResult.User2) AND
      (P1.fruit = P2.fruit)

This returns the following result, but as you see, it is in some way "duplicated":

I have tried solving this using GROUP BY fruit but it will not return the correct result on the general case. Limit 1 also would not work on the general case. So after numerous hours trying to figure this out, I must ask:

Is there a way to prevent this kind of duplication on the general case?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of U1.uID != U2.uID, write U1.uID > U2.uID.

share|improve this answer
    
Such a simple but powerful trick! Thanks, exactly what I was looking for! –  Vlad Schnakovszki Feb 7 '13 at 21:20
add comment

The problem you're encountering is that every single row is going to be duplicated, a--b and b--a. You need some way of specifying that you only want one or the other, but the question is, which one? Do you have a preference whether Priscilla is listed before Marcia, or vice versa?

If there is no preference, then you can just make up some arbitrary rule that will only allow one or the other to go through. For example, you can compare names and only grab rows where the first name is lexicographically before the second (see last line):

SELECT DISTINCT NAME1, OS1, DEV1, NAME2, OS2, DEV2, P1.fruit FROM Pick AS P1, Pick AS P2, 

(SELECT U1.uID AS User1, U1.name AS NAME1, U1.deviceOS AS OS1, U1.deviceType AS DEV1, 
        U2.uID AS User2, U2.name AS NAME2, U2.deviceOS AS OS2, U2.deviceType AS DEV2
FROM User AS U1, User AS U2 
WHERE (U1.uID != U2.uID) AND
      (U1.deviceType = U2.deviceType) AND
      (U1.deviceOS = "4" OR U1.deviceOS = "4.1") AND
      (U2.deviceOS = "4" OR U2.deviceOS = "4.1")) AS PartialResult

WHERE (P1.uID = PartialResult.User1) AND
      (P2.uID = PartialResult.User2) AND
      (P1.fruit = P2.fruit) AND
      (STRCMP(NAME1, NAME2) < 0)

Of course, you can implement any rule you want that picks one or the other. @igelkott's answer solves the problem the same way by enforcing person 1's uID to be higher than person 2's uID, which is very reasonable (and faster than doing string compares).

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is also a good one! Thank you! –  Vlad Schnakovszki Feb 7 '13 at 21:22
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.