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I'm trying to find a way to rework this transform to where I do not have to use the ancestor:: axis in my Xpath:

<xsl:template match="p[ancestor::p]">
     <xsl:apply-templates select="node() except ppr" />
</xsl:template>

Example of source:

<root>
  <p>
     <p/>
     <section>
        <p/>
     </section>
     <ppr/>
     <content/>
     <p/>
     <picture/>
  </p>
</root>

Desired output:

<root>
  <p>
     <section>
     </section>
     <ppr/>
     <content/>
     <picture/>
  </p>
</root>

I cannot use explicit Xpath or positioning to grab these <p> elements as their location is random and without pattern in my original source document.

The reason I'm trying to not use ancestor:: is because the XSLT processor I'm using is taking over 30-50 seconds evaluating that Xpath expression. I don't want this question to be about which XSLT processor I'm using or other implementations with my setup but rather focus on the question at hand: Is there any way to not use ancestor:: in my above transform?

Thanks in advance.

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1  
Is there a requirement that you use only xslt-2.0 (the tag implies this)? The xslt tag implies that any version will work. –  Ryan Gates Feb 7 '13 at 21:52
    
@Ryan Gates, sorry Ryan that is a bit misleading, this is only for XSLT-2.0. –  Laterade Feb 7 '13 at 21:56
4  
Why not just use //p//p ? –  BeniBela Feb 7 '13 at 23:11
    
@BeniBela That worked!! Thank you! –  Laterade Feb 7 '13 at 23:22
    
guess I should post it as answer then –  BeniBela Feb 8 '13 at 0:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Turned out to be as simple as:

//p//p
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2  
The leading "//" is unnecessary in a match pattern: its only effect is to ensure that "p" elements are only matched if they are part of a complete document, and in your case this test is almost certainly redundant (and it will add a few microseconds). –  Michael Kay Feb 8 '13 at 7:58

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