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I have a generic interface with several implementation classes, which I need to serialise and deserialise via Json. I'm trying to get started with Jackson, using full data-binding, without much luck.

The sample code illustrates the problem:

import org.codehaus.jackson.map.*;
import org.codehaus.jackson.map.type.TypeFactory;
import org.codehaus.jackson.type.JavaType;

public class Test {

    interface Result<T> {}

    static class Success<T> implements Result<T> {
        T value;
        T getValue() {return value;}
        Success(T value) {this.value = value;}
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Result<String> result = new Success<String>("test");
        JavaType type = TypeFactory.defaultInstance().constructParametricType(Result.class, String.class);
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper().enableDefaultTyping();
        ObjectWriter writer = mapper.writerWithType(type);
        ObjectReader reader = mapper.reader(type);

        try {
            String json = writer.writeValueAsString(result);
            Result<String> result2 = reader.readValue(json);
            Success<String> success = (Success<String>)result2;
        } catch (Throwable ex) {
            System.out.print(ex);
        }
    }
}

The call to writeValueAsString to causes the following exception:

org.codehaus.jackson.map.JsonMappingException: No serializer found for class Test$Success and no properties discovered to create BeanSerializer (to avoid exception, disable SerializationConfig.Feature.FAIL_ON_EMPTY_BEANS) )

Why is Jackson expecting me to register a serializer - I though the point of full data-binding was that I wouldn't need to do this?

Is the above approach correct?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, you need to register the specialized type to use it with Jackson using the factory method TypeFactory.constructSpecializedType. Then, the specialized type should be a bean (it should have a default constructor, getters and setters) to deserialize it.

Take a look at these tests clarifiers.

@Test
public void canSerializeParametricInterface() throws IOException {
    final ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper().enableDefaultTyping();
    final JavaType baseInterface = TypeFactory.defaultInstance().constructParametricType(Result.class, String.class);
    final JavaType subType = TypeFactory.defaultInstance().constructSpecializedType(baseInterface, Success.class);
    final ObjectWriter writer = mapper.writerWithType(subType);
    final String json = writer.writeValueAsString(Success.create("test"));
    Assert.assertEquals("{\"value\":\"test\"}", json);
}

@Test
public void canDeserializeParametricInterface() throws IOException {
    final ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper().enableDefaultTyping();
    final JavaType baseInterface = TypeFactory.defaultInstance().constructParametricType(Result.class, String.class);
    final JavaType subType = TypeFactory.defaultInstance().constructSpecializedType(baseInterface, Success.class);
    final ObjectReader reader = mapper.reader(subType);
    final Success<String> success = reader.readValue("{\"value\":\"test\"}");
    Assert.assertEquals("test", success.getValue());
}

public static interface Result<T> {
}

public static class Success<T> implements Result<T> {

    private T value;

    public static <T> Success<T> create(T value) {
        final Success<T> success = new Success<T>();
        success.value = value;
        return success;
    }

    public T getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public void setValue(T value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the example. The problem for me is that my classes are all immutable - no default constructor and no setters - just constructors which set all fields. Is there a way to get your approach to work with immutable classes? –  jon-hanson Feb 11 '13 at 12:08
    
The other problem with your example is that when deserializing the json you know that the target is the Success class. In my case there are several classes implementing the Result interface so I need Jackson to determine which one to use, possibly by incorporating the sub-type in the json. –  jon-hanson Feb 11 '13 at 12:16
    
Try to look at wiki.fasterxml.com/JacksonPolymorphicDeserialization. –  maurocchi Feb 13 '13 at 15:06
    
After various attempts I eventually got the polymorhpic stuff working with mixins. In the end I dumped it all in favour of switching on ObjectMapper.DefaultTyping.NON_FINAL which incorporate the object type for all non-primitives into the JSON. Will accept this answer nonetheless, as it was helpful. –  jon-hanson Feb 17 '13 at 15:46

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