Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to Oracle. Is there a builtin keyword does the same job of SQL Server APPLY?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I think the equivalent of the APPLY clause in Oracle is called a lateral JOIN. A lateral join in Oracle is when you join a table A with a function F that outputs rows and this function has columns of A as parameters.

Let's build a small example with this setup:

SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE emp_row AS OBJECT (
  2     empno NUMBER(4),
  3     ename VARCHAR(10),
  4     job VARCHAR(9),
  5     deptno NUMBER(2)
  6  );
  7  /

Type created
SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE emp_tab AS TABLE OF emp_row;
  2  /

Type created
SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_emp_dept(p_deptno NUMBER) RETURN emp_tab IS
  2     l_result emp_tab;
  3  BEGIN
  4     SELECT emp_row(empno, ename, job, deptno)
  5       BULK COLLECT INTO l_result
  6       FROM emp
  7      WHERE deptno = p_deptno;
  8     RETURN l_result;
  9  END get_emp_dept;
 10  /

Function created

A lateral join is automatic in Oracle, there is no special keyword:

SQL> SELECT dept.dname, emp.empno, emp.ename, emp.job
  2    FROM dept
  3   CROSS JOIN TABLE(get_emp_dept(dept.deptno)) emp;

DNAME          EMPNO ENAME      JOB
-------------- ----- ---------- ---------
ACCOUNTING      7782 CLARK      MANAGER
ACCOUNTING      7839 KING       PRESIDENT
ACCOUNTING      7934 MILLER     CLERK
RESEARCH        7369 SMITH      CLERK
RESEARCH        7566 JONES      MANAGER
RESEARCH        7788 SCOTT      ANALYST
RESEARCH        7876 ADAMS      CLERK
RESEARCH        7902 FORD       ANALYST
SALES           7499 ALLEN      SALESMAN
SALES           7521 WARD       SALESMAN
SALES           7654 MARTIN     SALESMAN
SALES           7698 BLAKE      MANAGER
SALES           7844 TURNER     SALESMAN
SALES           7900 JAMES      CLERK

14 rows selected
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't it better to use varchar2() instead of varchar() in the type definition? –  tuinstoel Sep 25 '09 at 9:56
    
@tuinstoel: you're right it's a good habit to use VARCHAR2 in Oracle. –  Vincent Malgrat Sep 25 '09 at 10:09
    
The question is a bit too abstract. There are cases where this approach doesn't help at all, e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/19009476/… –  Andrew not the Saint Sep 25 '13 at 16:11
    
@andrew Nothing prevents you from writing a function that returns 2 rows with the parameters from the table, as I have done above =) Not as practical but still doable. –  Vincent Malgrat Sep 26 '13 at 8:52
    
Does anyone have a link to official documentation for this behavior? I agree the CROSS JOIN is treated as a LATERAL join in Oracle 11. In 12c I suspect we could use CROSS APPLY to be clearer, but in prior versions the CROSS JOIN behavior transformation into a lateral join is misleading. –  bdeem Dec 22 '14 at 17:44

In Oracle we can use a pipelined function in the FROM clause by using the TABLE() function.

SQL> select * from table( get_dept_emps (10) )
  2  /

ENAME                                 SAL MGR
------------------------------ ---------- ---------------------
BOEHMER                              2450 SCHNEIDER
SCHNEIDER                            5000
KISHORE                              1300 BOEHMER

SQL>

This can be treated like any other table, for instance, by joining to it:

SQL> select t.*
  2         , e.empno
  3  from
  4     table( get_dept_emps (10) ) t
  5             join emp e
  6             on e.ename = t.ename
  7  /

ENAME             SAL MGR             EMPNO
---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
BOEHMER          2450 SCHNEIDER        7782
SCHNEIDER        5000                  7839
KISHORE          1300 BOEHMER          7934

SQL>
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a bunch APC.. this is what i expected.... –  oscar Sep 25 '09 at 9:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.