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I have a text file ("file.txt") with the following contents:

#   disutil_screening = 0.00000; # favorable
    disutil_screening = 0.00009; # base
#   disutil_screening = 0.00019; # unfavorable

I need to toggle which of these 3 lines (either the "favorable", "base", or "unfavorable") is commented-out using GNU Sed.

I know that I can match the "favorable" line with code such as the following (where, as a dummy example, I simply replace text with "aaa"):

$ cat file.txt | sed -r 's/#[\t]disutil_screening[\ =0-9\.;]+# favorable/aaa/'
aaa
    disutil_screening = 0.00009; # base
#   disutil_screening = 0.00019; # unfavorable

However, this example Sed statement is obviously far from what I actually want. I need a Sed expression that will merely remove the leading "#". That is, I need a Sed expression ($EXPR) such that the contents of "file.txt" as shown above are modified in the following way:

$ cat file.txt | sed -r $EXPR
    disutil_screening = 0.00000; # favorable
    disutil_screening = 0.00009; # base
#   disutil_screening = 0.00019; # unfavorable

Once I know how to do this (replace the leading "#" with "" for the "favorable" line), then I believe I can figure out how to add a "#" to the "base" line (i.e. comment out lines that are currently not commented-out).

Note: I'm open to using awk for this task instead of sed, but I'm a little intimidated by awk, never having used it before.

share|improve this question
    
FYI: Actually, there are many different disutil_* statements in the text file. But for the purpose of this question, I simply assumed that the only one is disutil_screening. There are actually disutil_biopsy, disutil_surgery, etc. Because there are many disutil's, I need to make this toggling of commented lines automated. –  synaptik Feb 7 '13 at 22:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think that what you need is called grouping. Try this one:

$ cat file.txt | sed -r 's/#([\t]disutil_screening[\ =0-9\.;]+# favorable)/\1/'

I wrapped all the match expect the first commenting character into the group and then replace the whole match with this group so the first character is removed.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, so for the case of commenting out a currently uncommented line, I could do something like this, right? 's/^([\t]disutil_screening[\ =0-9\.;]+# favorable)/#\1/' –  synaptik Feb 7 '13 at 22:31
    
Thanks, this is just what I needed! –  synaptik Feb 7 '13 at 22:35
    
How come when I use your sed expression but add the -i option, I get the error: invalid reference \1 on `s' command's RHS? –  synaptik Feb 7 '13 at 22:41
2  
If you're using -r you don't need to escape the brackets. I suspect you're escaping the brackets, so \1 is looking for a group that doesn't exist. –  hoipolloi Feb 7 '13 at 22:46
    
I'm not escaping the brackets. Here is the command I'm using: sed -ir 's/#([\t]disutil_screening[\ =0-9\.;]+# unfavorable)/\1/' file.txt –  synaptik Feb 7 '13 at 22:49

Here's what I came up with. Note, -i makes the replacement inline (i.e. your original file will be changed).

$ sed -i 's/^#\(.*# favorable\)$/ \1/' text.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm glad to see your answer which supplements AlexAtNet's by demonstrating the syntax for capture groups when not using the -r option. I learn more from seeing both ways :) –  synaptik Feb 7 '13 at 22:35

using awk

awk -F= '$2 ~ / favorable/{sub("#","")}1' temp.txt

Output

   disutil_screening = 0.00000; # favorable
    disutil_screening = 0.00009; # base
#   disutil_screening = 0.00019; # unfavorable
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. One of these days, I should learn awk. –  synaptik Feb 8 '13 at 14:59

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