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I'm trying to find the line of first occurrence of the string "victory" in each txt file in a folder. For each first "victory" in file I would like to save the number from that line to @num and the file name to @filename

Example: For the file a.txt that starts with the line: "lalala victory 123456" -> $num[$i]=123456 and $filename[$i]="a.txt"

ARGV holds all the file names. my problem is that I'm trying to go line by line and I don't know what I'm doing wrong. one more thing - how can I get the last occurrence of "victory" in the last file??

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Find;

my $dir = "D:/New folder";   
find(sub { if (-f && /\.txt$/) { push @ARGV, $File::Find::name } }, $dir);   $^I = ".bak"; 

my $argvv;
my $counter=0;
my $prev_arg=0;
my $line = 0;

my @filename=0;
my @num=0;
my $i = 0;

foreach $argvv (@ARGV)
{
    #open $line, $argvv or die "Could not open file: $!";
    my $line = IN 
    while (<$line>)
    {
        if (/victory/)
        {
            $line = s/[^0-9]//g;    
            $first_bit[$i] = $line;
            $filename[$i]=$argvv;
            $i++;
            last;
        }

    }
    close $line;
}


for ($i=0; $i<3; $i++)
{
    print $filename[$i]."  ".$num[$i]."\n";
}

Thank you very much! :)

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last-occurrence and findfirst are tags? Really? –  TLP Feb 7 '13 at 22:49
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your example script has a number of minor problems. The following example should do what you want in a fairly clean manner:

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Find;

# Find the files we're interested in parsing
my @files = ();
my $dir = "D:/New folder";
find(sub { if (-f && /\.txt$/) { push @files, $File::Find::name } }, $dir);

# We'll store our results in a hash, rather than in 2 arrays as you did
my %foundItems = ();

foreach my $file (@files)
{
    # Using a lexical file handle is the recommended way to open files
    open my $in, '<', $file or die "Could not open $file: $!";
    while (<$in>)
    {
        # Uncomment the next two lines to see what's being parsed
        # chomp; # Not required, but helpful for the debug print below
        # print "$_\n"; # Print out the line being parsed; for debugging

        # Capture the number if we find the word 'victory'
        # This assumes the number is immediately after the word; if that
        # is not the case, it's up to you to modify the logic here
        if (m/victory\s+(\d+)/)
        {
            $foundItems{$file} = $1; # Store the item
            last;
        }
    }
    close $in;
}

foreach my $file (sort keys %foundItems)
{
    print "$file=> $foundItems{$file}\n";
}
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Thank you! I used your code and for some reason it reads only the lines with an even line number: second line, forth line, sixth line... I really don't understand how could it be. I would really appreciate some help with that because I'm a total noob. Thanks! –  MiSo Feb 8 '13 at 9:57
    
The while loop reads every line in each file it processes, but only stores the first instance of victory <some_number>. Could it be that your hits just happen to be on even lines? You could add a print statement (print "$_\n";) to the loop to see exactly what's being parsed. It might also help to add a chomp; at the top of that loop. I'll modify my example to include these. –  Jonah Bishop Feb 8 '13 at 14:35
    
It works! Thank you! My problem was that in the inner loop i wrote $line = <$in> so it i got every second line. It makes sense to me now. It was a pretty stupid mistake. Thank you very nuch for your help! –  MiSo Feb 8 '13 at 15:49
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the below searches for a string abc in all the files(file*.txt) and prints only the first line.

perl -lne 'BEGIN{$flag=1}if(/abc/ && $flag){print $_;$flag=0}if(eof){$flag=1}' file*.txt

tested:

> cat temp
abc 11
22
13
,,
abc 22
bb
cc
,,
ww
kk
ll
,,

> cat temp2
abc t goes into 1000
fileA1, act that abc specific place

> perl -lne 'BEGIN{$flag=1}if(/abc/ && $flag){print $_;$flag=0}if(eof){$flag=1}' temp temp2
abc 11
abc t goes into 1000
> 
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