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I have a routine that promotes an array of single precision data to double precision in place using that the array is appropriately sized to handle the extra bytes:

void dpromote(const int n, double *x)             
{
    for (int i = n; i --> 0 ;) {    
        x[i] = ((float *)x)[i];
    }
}

On entry, x should contain n floats and on exit it will contain n doubles:

void test_dpromote()
{
    double  e[]   = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7};
    float   x[]   = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};
    const int n = sizeof(e)/sizeof(e[0]);
    dpromote(n, (void *) x);
    /* memcmp(x, e, sizeof(e)) will return 0 when this works as expected */
}

Why am I doing this? Mixed precision iterative refinement within a numerics-heavy code. For the purposes of this question, you can ignore why as its genuinely irrelevant.

Multiple compilers are okay with the dpromote logic at a variety of aggressive optimization levels with strict aliasing enabled. Recently, one compiler vendor (who shall remain nameless) decided to re-index my loop so that it was a forward traversal through memory instead of a backwards traversal. If you stare at the code for half a minute, you'll see that loop transformation produces utter garbage.

Does the dpromote logic, with all the C99 strict-aliasing bells and whistles enabled, rely on undefined behavior? I can't figure out why a compiler would think it okay to change the loop indexing unless the code is doing undefined things.

share|improve this question
    
I think float * and double * are not considered compatible types so your cast might be violationg strict-aliasing. –  cnicutar Feb 7 '13 at 22:59
    
That seems to be the case-- removing -ansi-alias from the compilation fixes the issue. I'd be happy to accept your response as an answer if you make it one. –  Rhys Ulerich Feb 8 '13 at 15:35
    
Really, I wasn't sure, just guessing in fact. I think you're now the best to answer this question. Would upvote :-) –  cnicutar Feb 8 '13 at 20:14
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, you are breaking the strict aliasing rules. Use a union - it may not maintain your original layout, however it reflects your intent much better and is generally cleaner:

#include <stdio.h>

union value 
{
    double d;
    float f;
};

void dpromote (const int n, value* x)
{
    for (int i=0; i < n; ++i)
        x[i].d = x[i].f;
}

void test_dpromote()
{
    value x[] = {{.f=1}, {.f=2}, {.f=3}, {.f=4}, {.f=5}, {.f=6}, {.f=7}};
    const int n = sizeof(x) / sizeof(x[0]);

    for (int i=0; i < n; ++i)
        printf("float: %f\n", x[i].f);

    dpromote(n, x);

    for (int i=0; i < n; ++i)
        printf("double: %f\n", x[i].d);
}

int main ()
{
    test_dpromote();
    return 0;
}

If you must maintain the original layout then you'll need to manage the block of memory manually to satisfy strict aliasing rules:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

double* dpromote (const int n, char* x)
{
    for (int i=n; i-- > 0; )
    {
        float f;
        memcpy(&f, &x[i*sizeof(float)], sizeof(f));
        double d = f;
        memcpy(&x[i*sizeof(double)], &d, sizeof(d));
    }

    return (double*)x;
}

void test_dpromote()
{
    int const n = 7;
    char* block = (char*)malloc(n*sizeof(double));
    for (int i=0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        float const x = i+1;
        memcpy(&block[i*sizeof(float)], &x, sizeof(x));
    }

    // It is now safe to access block through x

    float* x = (float*)block;
    for (int i=0; i < n; ++i)
        printf("float: %f\n", x[i]);

    double* y = dpromote(n, block);
    for (int i=0; i < n; ++i)
        printf("double: %f\n", y[i]);

    // It is now safe to access block through y, however
    // subsequent access through x will violate strict aliasing rules
}

int main ()
{
    test_dpromote();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response. Maintaining the original layout is an unchangeable requirement. –  Rhys Ulerich Feb 21 '13 at 16:35
    
@Rhys Updated my response. Note that you might be able to pass dpromote (char*)x above without breaking strict aliasing rules (I'm uncertain), however either way this really breaks your intent. Store the array permanently as a raw character array in a structure and interact with it through some helpers. –  SamB Feb 21 '13 at 19:41
    
Sorry for the slow response-- I do plan to investigate your updated solution before week's end and will get back to you. Thank you for your time. –  Rhys Ulerich Mar 6 '13 at 4:48
    
That approach worked. Thank you. –  Rhys Ulerich Apr 8 '13 at 16:46
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