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I have the following function for deleting the min element:

int BinaryTree::delete_min_helper(TreeNode *node){

   while(node->left != NULL){
     node = node->left;
   }

   if(node == root){
     return 1;
   }

   delete node;
   node = NULL;
   return 0;
}

I always pass a pointer to the root node to this function. I've tried this and a few variations of it, but it always seems to delete the the wrong thing or not delete anything at all. Any ideas why?

Here is a compilable example:

#ifndef _TREE_H_
#define _TREE_H_

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

struct TreeNode {
  int val;
  char *str;
  TreeNode *left;
  TreeNode *right;
};

class BinaryTree {
  public:

 BinaryTree();
 ~BinaryTree();

 int insert_node(unsigned int val, char *str);
 TreeNode *find_min();
 int delete_min();
 void print();

 private:

 int insert_node_helper(TreeNode *&node, unsigned int val, char *str);
 int delete_min_helper(TreeNode *node);
 void print_helper(TreeNode *node);

 TreeNode *root;  
};

#endif

BinaryTree::BinaryTree(){
  this->root = NULL;
}


BinaryTree::~BinaryTree(){
}

int BinaryTree::insert_node(unsigned int val, char *str){
  return insert_node_helper(this->root, val, str);
}

int BinaryTree::insert_node_helper(TreeNode *&node, unsigned int val, char *str){

  if(node == NULL){
    node = new TreeNode;
    node->val = val;
    node->str = strdup(str);
    node->left = NULL;
    node->right = NULL;
    if(node != NULL){
      return 0;
    }else{
      puts("inserted null node");
      return 1;
   }
 }else if(val <= node->val){
   return insert_node_helper(node->left, val, str);
 }else if(val > node->val){
   return insert_node_helper(node->right, val, str);
 }

 return 1;
}

void BinaryTree::print(){
  print_helper(this->root);
}


void BinaryTree::print_helper(TreeNode *node){

    if(node != NULL){
      print_helper(node->right);
      printf("%d occurrences of \"%s\"\n", node->val, node->str);
      print_helper(node->left);
    }

}

TreeNode *BinaryTree::find_min(){
  TreeNode *temp = this->root;
  while(temp->left != NULL){
    temp = temp->left;
  }
  return temp;
}

int BinaryTree::delete_min(){
   return delete_min_helper(root);
}

int BinaryTree::delete_min_helper(TreeNode *node){

   while(node->left != NULL){
     node = node->left;
   }

  if(node == root){
    puts("attempted to delete root");
    return 1;
  }

  delete node;
  node = NULL;
  return 0;
}

#include <time.h>

int main(){

  BinaryTree bt;

  srand(time(NULL));
  for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
     bt.insert_node(rand() % 20, "test");
  }

  bt.print();
  printf("min val = %d\n", bt.find_min()->val);
  puts("#################################");
  bt.delete_min();
  bt.print();
  printf("min val = %d\n", bt.find_min()->val);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Any particular reason you're setting your node pointer to NULL immediately BEFORE you delete it (which does nothing now but solidify with a vengeance your memory leak).? Also note. your using a reference. You're changing the inbound pointer with each leap down a level in the tree. the last one being setting it to null, then deleting nothing. Finally, your algorithm does nothing to account for a tree that is right-weighted exclusively and has no left. The proper action there is to delete the root node, but you better find the right replacement before doing so. –  WhozCraig Feb 7 '13 at 22:50
1  
off topic: why do you have *& and why does your function returns 0 for no reason and why do you delete with node = NULL as well as delete node? –  gokcehan Feb 7 '13 at 22:51
    
@WhozCraig, thanks for the comment. Very helpful! I added a check for the root node. In this case it deletes everything except the root. –  user2052561 Feb 7 '13 at 23:15
    
@user2052561: You're still using a reference. See my answer for details. –  Kleist Feb 7 '13 at 23:32
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1 Answer

You are taking a reference to a pointer as argument (TreeNode *&node), and then modify it. So if you pass the root of your tree to this method, you will eventually set the root to NULL.

Additionally this actually deletes absolutely nothing, because you call delete after setting the pointer to NULL, and delete called on a null-pointer does nothing.

Update after edit of original post:

I assume root is a member of BinaryTree. It would be easier to help you if you posted a Short, Self Contained, Compilable Example.

You're still taking root as a reference. Thus node == root will always be true, and you'll never reach your delete statement. So actually you're not deleting anything, but you're changing your root to be the left-most child node.

Try changing your method signature to

int BinaryTree::delete_min_helper(TreeNode *node){

that is, without the ampersand (&).

After edit:

Ok, now I've run your program, and found your second problem. In the line

node = NULL;

You're changing the value of a local pointer, not of the left-pointer in the parent node. This means than when you traverse the tree the next time, you will access a pointer to the memory you just deleted. That triggers undefined behaviour. To get around this you should set the left-pointer of your parent node to 0 when you delete your leaf-node.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay. I was thinking that for the delete to be persistent I needed to use a reference or pointer to pointer, but your suggestion seems to work. Thank you! –  user2052561 Feb 7 '13 at 23:39
1  
@user2052561 "...seems to work" Hmm. For your own sake, try to understand why your assumptions were wrong and why this answer is right, rather than being happy with the fact that it seems to work. –  us2012 Feb 7 '13 at 23:49
    
Thank guys. This still doesn't do what it's supposed to. Per request, I made the SSCCE. –  user2052561 Feb 8 '13 at 1:35
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