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I am now the maintainer of the fork of GPL'd project. The sources of this project have copyright notice on top of them like

// Copyright 2004-2010 Author name/family name.
.... snip ...
// You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
// along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
// Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
//
// e-mail : author@email
// home   : author.website
//
// *************************************************************************

What do I need to change in there to notify ppl that I have contributed to these files and that I am now the maintainer?

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1  
How much fork is your fork? Pressing the fork button on Github or fork as in real fork because of being dissatisfied by the original project? –  hakre Feb 13 '13 at 15:25
    
The latter. There has already been a month's work of changes –  Zeks Feb 13 '13 at 20:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

What do I need to change in there to notify ppl that I have contributed to these files and that I am now the maintainer?

By law - IIRC IAASD, IANAL/IANYL - you can not alter this statement without violation the authors original rights. Which - as the code is under the GPL - will also make you loose the right to fork IMHO.

As long as you made copyrightable changes to that file and you don't intend to contribute them back to the original project, you put your own copyright statement at the very top of the file and then you say that there are additional notices and you then list all other notices.

For example:

// *************************************************************************
// This file is part of Fork of the Mighty Moo
//
// Copyright (c) 2012  GPL Project Developer Who Made Changes <gpl@example.org>
//  
//  Fork of the Mighty Moo is free software: you may copy, redistribute
//  and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
//  published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 2 of the
//  License, or (at your option) any later version.
//  
//  This file is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
//  WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
//  MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
//  General Public License for more details.
//  
//  You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
//  along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
//
// This file incorporates work covered by the following copyright and
// permission notice:  
//
//   Copyright 2004-2010 Author name/family name.
//   .... snip ...
//   You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
//   along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
//   Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
//
//   e-mail : author@email
//   home   : author.website
//
// *************************************************************************

You should keep the same license version to have it license-compatible with the previous work. At least if you plan to upgrade the GPL version, think about the reasons why you want that twice.

If the license versions are exactly the same, you can re-use the part about the GPL version that previously existed. You then might even be able to remove it (the duplicate text) because you don't remove it (totally) as those are not any additional terms, the work is still covered by the exact terms, already given at the very top.

Then there is a bit of a difference between being a Maintainer, a Contributor and an Author.

If you don't have made any copyrightable changes you still might want to put a new message on top (similar to what already outlined), just not a copyright notice but that the file in that repro / source-package is part a new software (the fork) and under which license. So it's clear to everybody that this is a fork.

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Thanks for detailed comment :) No I have to change everything again :) –  Zeks Feb 13 '13 at 20:28

in no cases you shall remove the original copyright. Once you changed something in the code, you can add your copyright above or below the original copyright, stating the changes you have done.

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Of course I won't remove the original copyright. But what exactly can and should I change? For example how do I state what changes I have made? –  Zeks Feb 7 '13 at 23:01
    
in code you can change what you need. if its a minor change i would add some lines below in the copyright header with your name and the changes, if it is a major rework, you could add your copyright above, and state that this work is based on old name/family name original copyright is: then the original copyright follows –  AlexWien Feb 7 '13 at 23:08
    
Well, there's a ton of changes everywhere as there's been porting from qt3 to qt4 so stating individual changes is out of the question I think... Will just adding my copyright below the author's with the years I've been actively working on these files suffice? –  Zeks Feb 7 '13 at 23:10
    
yes, and there is still source code management (git, svn) –  AlexWien Feb 7 '13 at 23:33

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