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I have a csv file named data_export_20130206-F.csv. It contains data that contains double quotes (") which is making it very messy to parse.

File looks kind of like this (but with more fields)

"stuff","zipcode"
"<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>","90210"

I want to "escape" the quotes that are within the fields so it will look like this (Note: the quotes within the xml have been doubled):

"stuff","zipcode"
"<?xml version=""1.0"" encoding=""utf-8"" ?>","90210"

But when I run this:

cat data_export_20130206-F.csv| sed -E 's@([^,])(\")([^,])@\1""\3@g'

Unfortunately, It adds an additional double quote at the end of each line making the document invalid.

"stuff","zipcode""
"<?xml version=""1.0"" encoding=""utf-8"" ?>","90210""

How do I replace double quotes within csv fields but not add a trailing double quote to each line?

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I think that there may be trailing whitespace on those lines. You should get rid of that first and then your sed should work – Explosion Pills Feb 7 '13 at 23:45

Make sure that there is no trailing whitespace before the final " or else your replacement will match it. You can use sed to trim trailing whitespace too:

sed 's/\s\+$//' x.csv | sed -E 's@([^,])(\")([^,])@\1""\3@g'
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Also, this wipes out the $ which merges lines, can I keep the newlines? – PeppyHeppy Feb 8 '13 at 1:16

Another way is to just strip the extraneus double quote in a second pass:

sed -E 's@([^,])(\")([^,])@\1""\3@g' data_export_20130206-F.csv | sed 's,"\("$\),\1,'

or simply by squashing all the quote repetitions with tr (but this would break if any field would end with a quote):

sed -E 's@([^,])(\")([^,])@\1""\3@g' data_export_20130206-F.csv | tr -s '"'

If you still get newlines stripped for some reason, readd them on substitution:

sed -E 's@([^,])(\")([^,])@\1""\3@g' data_export_20130206-F.csv | sed 's,""$,"\n,'
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this wipes out the $ which merges lines, can I keep the newlines? – PeppyHeppy Feb 8 '13 at 1:16
    
Really? Mighty odd, what kind of sed do you have? I'll update the answer with a safer solution. – lynxlynxlynx Feb 8 '13 at 9:11

Here is a fragile solution, but it works for the input you provided.

perl -pe 's/(?:^"|"(?=,)|"$|(?<=,)")//g;s/"/""/g;s/^/"/;s/$/"/;s/(?:(?=,)|(?<=,))/"/g' FILENAME

Note commas within quotes will break this. Given your input, the following output was produced.

"stuff","zipcode"
"<?xml version=""1.0"" encoding=""utf-8"" ?>","90210"
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