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I am researching indexes in Oracle 10g to speed up a particular query. Over and over again I am reading that indexing low cardinality columns (columns with very few unique values, such as a gender column in an employee table) will very rarely help speed up lookups. This makes sense if the data in that low cardinality column is uniformly distributed e.g. ~50% of employee records have gender = 'M', the other ~50% have gender = 'F'. But what about if the data is not uniformly distributed and you are searching for the records that do not have the same key as the majority? What if the above gender column was indexed, the employee table was for a company that had 2% male and 98% female employees, and we only every do queries on the male employees. Does this low cardinality rule of thumb still hold up?

The situation i am dealing with now is a table that has a non-null binary column, each record always has either a 1 or a 0 stored. Within this table there are something like 99,999 records with a 0 and a single record which has a 1 stored. Oracle is opting for a full table scan when I have a b-tree index on this binary column.

I suppose part of what I am not understanding is what the b-tree would look like when the majority of keys are duplicates and why it would not be able to quickly find a set of records that are in the non-duplicate minority.

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I think that when you look up for the value "1" then it goes as fast as any index would do. But if you seek the 0 this is worst than a full table scan –  Sebas Feb 8 '13 at 0:30
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"Within this table there are something like 99,999 records with a 0 and a single record which has a 1 stored. Oracle is opting for a full table scan when I have a b-tree index on this binary column" . full scan when you put 1? if so did you gather a histogram on that column (as without it, oracle will assume a 50%-50% split of 1 and 0 and as such a Full table scan will look more appealing most likely. if you have a histogram oracle will realise that the estimated card will be very low for 1 and very high for 0 and thus full scan if you put 0 in the where clause and inx. for 1 –  user1788325 Feb 8 '13 at 2:07
    
@Dominic you were correct - the column needed a histogram, i am new at this and incorrectly assumed statistics were automatically being generated. Adding a frequency histogram made searching for the record with the "1" instantaneous and removed the full table scan. Thank you. –  Daniel C Martin Feb 8 '13 at 19:57

1 Answer 1

Dan,

And the answer lies in the question below. What are the various types/kinds of Indexes exists in Oracle (For Example) ??

When there are columns with more redundancy (Low Cardinality), Bitmap Indexes is the best choice.

e.g. Suppose a table with a column name 'Employee_status' .. Values (YES | NO) Select * from emp where Employee_Status='Regular';

If you have B-Tree Index, Hash index ... other than Bitmap Index, this will raraly help inspite of using Filters and Indexes.

Thanks Prashant Dixit www.oracleant.com

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