Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example:

public class App {

   private Car car = new Car();

   public static void main(String[] args) {
       // TO DO
   } 
}

If not good, what's the solution? How would you rewrite this code?

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

In my opinion everything depends in the design of the application you are working on. For the example provided I think it is acceptable. But for other more definitive data types, I would prefer constructor initialization. Primarily because constructor overloading is possible.

share|improve this answer

I have always been taught that you declare above and initialize inside. It is more efficient to initialize things inside of the constructor because if you need to change it with a passed in parameter upon construction you are initializing and assigning when you could just initialize.

For Example:

public class TestClass{
   //Declared but uninitialized
   Object obj;

   //Makes no difference but easier to read
   public TestClass(){
      this.obj = new Object();
   }

   //In this constructor however the object being passed in is what is initializing obj
   //-so if you were to initialize it above and then change it down here you are writing 
   //-to the mem twice and it is less efficient.  
   public TestClass(Object arg){
      this.obj = (Object)arg;
   }
}

The caveat to this is that memory these days is REALLY cheap. The only real purpose to doing it this way (other than not wanting to look like a rookie) is to make it manageable by other people.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you should say reusable instead of efficient. –  Sednus Feb 8 '13 at 21:27

Initializing the object in the declaration might be done if the program will "always" need an instance of the object and the cost of creating the instance is not too great (time, resources). Then yes, this type of "Eager Initiliazation" might be desired.

However, this design does go against OO design in keeping classes loosely coupled and make for harder unit testing.

In the example:

public class App {
  private Car car = new Car();
}

You are saying:

  1. App will "Always" require a Car object.
  2. Car will always be instantiated after App is instantiated. (This can be problematic if the instantiation of Car is expensive IE. it also has several objects that are created at instantiation, and say, it loads in data from remote call of some type)

Ideally you would only want to create the object when it might actually be needed. Or in a constructor (default or overloaded) to provide some flexibility.

public class App {
    private Car car;

    App() {
    }        

    // overloaded constructor
    App(Car car) {
        this.car = car;
    }

    public void setCar(Car car) {
        this.car = car;
    }

    public Car getCar() {
        return car;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) { 
        // default constructor, lightweight, no car initialization happening;
        App ap1 = new App();

       // Ok, now I want a car, and it should be red.
        Car redCar = new Car("red");
        ap1.setCar(redCar);


        // Using overloaded constructor, now I can control aspects of "car"
        Car blueCar = new Car("blue");
        App ap2 = new App(blueCar);
    }

}
share|improve this answer

If you want your code to be easier to test it's a bad practice. The reason why is that creating App will also create a Car whether you want it or not. Now, if Car has code that connects to a database, oops, now when you test App you need to have a database available you can connect to or your test will fail.

The solution is Dependency Injection aka Inversion of Control. You'd write it like this:

public class App {

   private Car car;

   public App(Car car) {
       this.car = car;
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
       // TO DO
   } 
}

Now creating App doesn't necessarily create a Car and they are coupled less.

Now, I'm being very pedantic here. I probably use your example all the time in my code. I'm just pointing out a downside. This isn't ALWAYS bad and isn't ALWAYS good.

share|improve this answer

private Car car = new Car();

This perfectly ok IMHO. A couple of reasons for not doing it:

  1. Car.<init> requires arguments that are only available in App.init
  2. App has many fields and others are need to be initialized in App.<init> and for consistency you want to keep them all together.

In any case, don't do the following:

private Car car = null;

Because every java developer knows that instance fields are initialized to null.

share|improve this answer

Apart from what tieTYT wrote, what's maybe worth considering is that if you instantiate all members in the constructor, it makes it more readable. Everything you need to know about a new object of the type can be learned by reading the constructor.

share|improve this answer

The perfect way to execute this code would be to create an Object of type App in the main method which would invoke the constructor for the Car class.So the code would go like this.

public class App {

    private Car car;

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
      App app=new App(); //
      app.car.  //Followed by the method or the member variable that you would like to
                //access

    } 

}

share|improve this answer
    
I've never seen code in main that looks that way. I'm specifically talking about setting its own fields directly. I don't recommend this way of doing it. This lets someone create an App and have a NPE later. If you passed it into the constructor you could fail faster. –  tieTYT Feb 8 '13 at 0:59

Use an Init() method for all initialization.

public class App {

private Car car;

public App() {
    this.car = null;
}

public void Init() {
    this.car = new Car();
}

public void Shutdown() {
    this.car = null;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    App app = new App();
    app.Init();
    app.Shutdown();
    app = null;
} 

}

share|improve this answer
    
Lazy initialization is often more expensive. Useful for initialization of expensive constructors (establishing a database connection) but I wouldn't recommend it as a standard. –  Sednus Feb 8 '13 at 2:13

note that there is a difference in the meaning between:

public class App {

   private Car car = new Car();

   public static void main(String[] args) {
       // TO DO
   } 
}

and

public class App {

   private Car car;
   public App(){
     car = new Car();
   } 
}

If new Car() fails in the first, for example, then you'll definitely have a fun time debugging that. The second is much more readable and debuggable if necessary. If you think of fields as sort of the pieces for the blueprint for a class, then it makes little sense to initialized them in their declaration. Since you have main here, this is probably your entry point, but for other classes, if you think of them as blueprints for objects, then the idea of constructors makes a lot of sense:

public class App{
  private Car car;
  public Car getCar(){
    return car;
  }
  public void setCar(Car car){
    this.car = car;
  }
  public App(Car car){
    this.car = car;
  }
}

This, i suppose, is the most common structure for oop classes.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hm your example needs a little work I think; you're trying to access an instance method in a static context. –  G. Bach Feb 8 '13 at 0:57
    
oh dear, that's embarassing. fixed ;) –  Jaynathan Leung Feb 8 '13 at 1:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.