Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For the purpose of the exercise, I have to implement the exponential function with the most basic arithmetic operations. I came up with this, where x is the base and y the exponent:

function expAetB() {
     product=1;
     for (i=0; i<y; i++)
     {
          product=product*x;
     }
     return product;
};

However, there are more basic operations than product=product*x;. I should somehow be able to insert instead another for loop which multiply and pass the result, but I can't find a way to do it without falling into an infinite loop.

share|improve this question
    
That was one of the worst titles I've seen on this site. Notice how I rewrote your title. –  John Saunders Feb 8 '13 at 2:40

1 Answer 1

In the same way that exponentiation is repeated multiplication, so multiplication is simply repeated addition.

Simply create another function mulAetB which does that for you, and watch out for things like negative inputs.

You could go even one more level and define adding in terms of increment and decrement, but that may be overkill.


See, for example, the following program which uses the overkill method of addition:

#include <stdio.h>

static unsigned int add (unsigned int a, unsigned int b) {
    unsigned int result = a;
    while (b-- != 0) result++;
    return result;
}

static unsigned int mul (unsigned int a, unsigned int b) {
    unsigned int result = 0;
    while (b-- != 0) result = add (result, a);
    return result;
}

static unsigned int pwr (unsigned int a, unsigned int b) {
    unsigned int result = 1;
    while (b-- != 0) result = mul (result, a);
    return result;
}

int main (void) {
    int test[] = {0,5, 1,9, 2,4, 3,5, 7,2, -1}, *ip = test;
    while (*ip != -1) {
        printf ("%d + %d = %3d\n"  , *ip, *(ip+1), add (*ip, *(ip+1)));
        printf ("%d x %d = %3d\n"  , *ip, *(ip+1), mul (*ip, *(ip+1)));
        printf ("%d ^ %d = %3d\n\n", *ip, *(ip+1), pwr (*ip, *(ip+1)));
        ip += 2;
    }
    return 0;
}

The output of this program shows that the calculations are correct:

0 + 5 =   5
0 x 5 =   0
0 ^ 5 =   0

1 + 9 =  10
1 x 9 =   9
1 ^ 9 =   1

2 + 4 =   6
2 x 4 =   8
2 ^ 4 =  16

3 + 5 =   8
3 x 5 =  15
3 ^ 5 = 243

7 + 2 =   9
7 x 2 =  14
7 ^ 2 =  49

If you really must have it in a single function, it's a simple matter of refactoring the function call to be inline:

static unsigned int pwr (unsigned int a, unsigned int b) {
    unsigned int xres, xa, result = 1;

    // Catch common cases, simplifies rest of function (a>1, b>0)

    if (b == 0) return 1;
    if (a == 0) return 0;
    if (a == 1) return 1;

    // Do power as repeated multiplication.

    result = a;
    while (--b != 0) {
        // Do multiplication as repeated addition.

        xres = result;
        xa = a;
        while (--xa != 0)
            result = result + xres;
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, thanks. But creating a second function is too much of a shortcut. Ideally, I should only use a series of imbricated loops and no shortcut such as product=product*x; –  user2052971 Feb 8 '13 at 4:07
    
@user2052971, contrived questions like you've asked for in the previous comment are incredibly unlikely to help future visitors (and hence risk being closed), simply because the only place you'll get such limitations is in the minds of deranged educators. But I'll do it as well for completeness. –  paxdiablo Feb 8 '13 at 5:05
    
Thanks for your answer and comments, i really appreciate it, but you are wrong about one thing... i think it's fun to understand how it works and for me it is an interesting challenge. Apparently, we are suppose to be able to do factorial and even substracting which seems amazing to me. So i guess some people not only want that the code works, but also want to know how it works. Thanks again! –  user2052971 Feb 8 '13 at 17:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.