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I am trying out to figure out what is meaning of

execute('SELECT customerID [CustomerID],customerCode[Customer Code],
firstName +char(32)+ surname AS [Name],street [Street],phone [Phone],*  
FROM tblCustomers  WHERE customerCode like '''+ @custCode +'%''')

in stored procedure. I tried to googled out so much, but not able to find out so at end I came here for help. As, I am converting SPs from MS SQL to MySQL, how can I translate this in MySQL? Is there any difference between Execute(' select * from tablename') and 'select * from tablename' ?

Thanks

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...inline sql. The sql server execute command will compile the argument as a sql statement and return the result set. Similar to execsql. IMO this is not a best practice. You are correct, this would be the same as issuing the query text in MySQL. –  lrb Feb 8 '13 at 2:49

1 Answer 1

SET @sql = CONCAT(' SELECT      *,
                            customerID,
                            customerCode `Customer Code`,
                            CONCAT(firstName, ' ', surname) AS `Name`,
                            street `Street`,
                            phone `Phone` 
                    FROM tblCustomers  
                    WHERE customerCode like ''', @custCode ,'%''');

PREPARE stmt FROM @sql;
EXECUTE stmt;
DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt;

or parameterized it,

SET @sql = '    SELECT      *,
                        customerID,
                        customerCode `Customer Code`,
                        CONCAT(firstName, ' ', surname) AS `Name`,
                        street `Street`,
                        phone `Phone` 
                FROM tblCustomers  
                WHERE customerCode LIKE CONCAT(?, ''%'')';

PREPARE stmt FROM @sql;
EXECUTE stmt USING @custCode;
DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt;
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