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I am exceptionally new to programming, but I am working on improving my skills as a programmer. Recently, I gave myself the challenge to determine what multiples of a given number are made up of distinct digits. I have gotten most of it to work, but I still need to make the code apply for every number that is a multiple of the input one. The code I have working so far is as follows:

Integer numberA = 432143;
Integer numberB = numberA;
Integer[] digitArray = new Integer[numberA.toString().length()];
int index;
for (index = 0; index < digitArray.length; index++) {
    digitArray[index] = (numberA % 10);
numberA /= 10;
}
int repeats = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < digitArray.length; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < digitArray.length; j++) {
    if ((i != j) && (digitArray[i]==digitArray[j])) repeats = repeats + 1;
    }
}
if (repeats == 0) {
  System.out.println(numberB);
}

This will determine if the number is made up of distinct digits, and, if it is, print it out. I have spent quite a bit of time trying to make the rest of the code work, and this is what I've come up with:

Integer number = 1953824;
Integer numberA = number;
Integer numberB = numberA;
for (Integer numberC = number; numberC.toString().length() < 11; 
            numberC = numberC + number) {
    Integer[] digitArray = new Integer[numberA.toString().length()];
    int index;
    for (index = 0; index < digitArray.length; index++) {
        digitArray[index] = (numberA % 10);
        numberA /= 10;
    }
    int repeats = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < digitArray.length; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < digitArray.length; j++) {
            if ((i != j) && (digitArray[i]==digitArray[j])) repeats = repeats + 1;
        }
    }
    if (repeats == 0) {
        System.out.println(numberB); 
    }
}

I can't figure out why, but his just prints whatever the number is a bunch of times if it is made up of distinct digits, and leaves it blank if it is not. If anyone could tell me why this is occurring, or even tell me what I need to do to fix it, that would be superb. Remember, I am very new to programming, so please give a short explanation for any terms you use that are at all out of the ordinary. I am eager to learn, but I currently know very little. Thank you for your time, and I greatly appreciate any and all help you can give me.

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Your code is a bit hard to read due to its formatting, and you may look into using white space more judiciously, including giving each ending curly brace its own line. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 8 '13 at 3:14
    
I didn't realize that... What do you mean, though; isn't java always formatted like this? –  Matthew Tyler Feb 8 '13 at 3:15
1  
No. See edits to your first post. The changes give your code more "breathing room". –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 8 '13 at 3:17
3  
Side Note: You probably use an int instead of an Integer in your for-loop. Using a primitive doesn't incur the overhead of boxing. –  Jeffrey Feb 8 '13 at 3:17
    
I've also edited your second code block. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 8 '13 at 3:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You assign the value of numberA to numberB (which is the value of number) right before the for loop. After that, numberB is never modified or assigned to a new value, so for every pass through the for loop, you're simply printing the value of numberB, which is always 1953824 in this case.

There are several corrections that can be made to achieve the result you desire, while cleaning up the code a little. The first thing is to change the print statement to print the correct number:

System.out.println(numberC);

Since numberC is the variable that is being updated by the for loop, that's what you'll want to conditionally print out if there are no repeat digits. Since we've replaced numberB with numberC, that means numberB is not longer needed, you can delete the declaration for it.

Now, the next issue is when you're defining the digital array - you should use the length of numberC, not numberA. Also, inside the for loop, you should assign numberA the value of numberC, or else eventually nothing but 0s will be stored in your digitArray. Overall, here's what it should look like.

    Integer number = 1953824;
    Integer numberA = number;

    for (Integer numberC = number; numberC.toString().length() < 11; 
                    numberC = numberC + number) {

        Integer[] digitArray = new Integer[numberC.toString().length()];
        numberA = numberC;
        int index;
        for (index = 0; index < digitArray.length; index++) {
            digitArray[index] = (numberA % 10);
            numberA /= 10;
        }
        int repeats = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < digitArray.length; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < digitArray.length; j++) {
                if ((i != j) && (digitArray[i] == digitArray[j]))
                    repeats = repeats + 1;
            }
        }
        if (repeats == 0) {
            System.out.println(numberC);
        }
    }

This should produce the desired result. It seems to work on my machine :)

If you want, you can take Jeffrey's suggestion and change the Integer to the primitive int to avoid the overhead of boxing. However, you still need to use the Integer class to use the toString() method, but you can accomplish that using Integer.valueOf():

Integer.valueOf(numberC).toString()
share|improve this answer
    
I used numberB because numberA was constantly being changed as a result of division by ten, but I see what you mean. I think it will fix it if I say that numberB and numberA both increase by number after every loop of the for. I added numberA = numberA + number; and the same for numberB right before the print statement, but all it did was print every multiple of number that an Integer could supply. –  Matthew Tyler Feb 8 '13 at 3:27
    
Would you be willing to show me what the code would look like fixed? I've been playing around with it for a bit, and it always gives me the full list of multiples of number. –  Matthew Tyler Feb 8 '13 at 3:36
    
Yes, I'm updating my answer to add more clarification. –  Ryan Thames Feb 8 '13 at 3:38
    
I don't think that works... For instance, if I set number equal to 5^9, it returns nothing, even though I know that 22*5^9 equals 42968750, which should be returned. –  Matthew Tyler Feb 8 '13 at 3:57
    
It was because numberA was never being updated, causing nothing but 0s to get stored in the digitArray. I updated my answer to reflect that. –  Ryan Thames Feb 8 '13 at 4:11

So if I understand correctly you are trying to find out if certain multiple exists within your number. Instead of constantly dividing by 10 instead use the modulus symbol. You can even embed it in conditional statements.

For example:

if(numberOne % 2 == 0)

Then we know that numberOne divided by 2 has a remainder of zero and is thus a multiple of 2

share|improve this answer
    
While that is a part of what I am trying to do, I don't think that using a modulus of number (I think that is what you mean) will help my issue too much, unless I'm mistaken. –  Matthew Tyler Feb 8 '13 at 3:28

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