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It seems the checkDisplay in the body of the page is triggered on each click of the check box. But how? The function does not seem to bind with the check box...

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>Checkbox</title>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var checkDisplay = function(check, form) { //check ID, form ID
        form = document.getElementById(form), check =         document.getElementById(check);
        check.onclick = function(){
            form.style.display = (this.checked) ? "block" : "none";
            form.reset();
        };
        check.onclick();
    };
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input type="checkbox" id="check" />
<form id="form">
    <input type="checkbox" /><input type="text" />
</form>
<script type="text/javascript">
checkDisplay("check", "form");
</script>

share|improve this question
    
check.onclick = function(){ that line looks quite of self-explanatory imo. –  Fabrício Matté Feb 8 '13 at 3:27
    
@FabrícioMatté I think it's actually the line above it that's a little confusing -- resetting check from a string to an object... –  sgeddes Feb 8 '13 at 3:29
    
I often overwrite variables in my code so I'm more used to that. Though, some proper indentation would make it more obvious. And obviously, you can't (or better, it'd have no effect to) assign an onclick property to a string. –  Fabrício Matté Feb 8 '13 at 3:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's because you're calling:

<script type="text/javascript">
checkDisplay("check", "form");
</script>

You are passing "check" which is creating an onclick event for your checbox:

check = document.getElementById(check);
check.onclick = function(){
    form.style.display = (this.checked) ? "block" : "none";
    form.reset();
};

Notice the line that is resetting check from the value "check" to the checkbox control on the page with that id.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
I was confused by the JavaScript coding style. It seems the "inline" function check.onclick can be triggered separately even it's embedded in outer function checkDisplay. I figure in the life cycle of this page, checkDisplay is triggered once only, while check.onclick is triggered on sack click. I figure it would be more clear if defining the check.onclick outside of checkDisplay... –  CCNA Feb 8 '13 at 3:44
    
@CCNA -- Yes it can, but in this case it's a little odd. Glad I could help! –  sgeddes Feb 8 '13 at 3:46
    
Right. In this case, onclick has to be inline since it needs to access form/check objects transferred from checkDisplay. But i'm still struggling to understand how an inline function is visible beyond... –  CCNA Feb 8 '13 at 4:06

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