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I've worked on this question and have it working properly for substitution variables declared, but I'm having trouble getting it to calculate properly for BIND variables. I've been told it's confusing with SQL*PLUS and Oracle's Developer. Here is my initial question that was answered correctly, but the BIND variable part is not working. Learning Bind Variables Question

So I have that code which calculates the volume of a Rectangular Prism using substitution variables, but wanted to use BIND variables declared like this. My textbook says that I have to use PRINT and print after the end; / command and doesn't show the dbms_output so that might be a problem. It's not a very practical way of doing things, I understand that.

SET SERVEROUTPUT ON
VARIABLE d_length NUMBER;
VARIABLE d_height NUMBER;
VARIABLE d_width NUMBER;

DECLARE 
    d_volume    NUMBER;
BEGIN
    :d_length := &q_length;
    :d_height := &q_height;
    :d_width := &q_width;

    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('The length dimension is: ' || :d_length);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('The height dimension is: ' || :d_height);
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('The width dimension is: ' || :d_width);  

    d_volume := :d_length * :d_height * :d_width;

    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(
        'The rectangular prism volume for the swimming pool is: ' 
           || d_volume);

END;
/

So my question is, how to get it to work with BIND variables, where I put the variables outside the block as VARIABLES, then declare d_volume, perform that calculation, and PRINT out the volume of the swimming pool using those bind variables. I'm close here, but something is off. It prints out the dbms_output statement, but doesn't show anything for the variables.

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3  
bind variables are placeholders in SQL statements. There's no SQL here, so it's really not at all clear what your ultimate goal is. –  APC Feb 8 '13 at 4:57
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1 Answer

As noted on the answer to your previous question, and in APC's comment, bind variables aren't giving you much here, but it seems to be an exercise, so... The code you have displays the values OK with dbms_output. To use PRINT instead, you can't declare d_volume in the PL/SQL block as it'll be out of scope when you exit the block, so you need to make that a variable as well:

VARIABLE d_length NUMBER;
VARIABLE d_height NUMBER;
VARIABLE d_width NUMBER;
VARIABLE d_volume NUMBER;

BEGIN
    :d_length := &q_length;
    :d_height := &q_height;
    :d_width := &q_width;

    :d_volume := :d_length * :d_height * :d_width;
END;
/

print d_length
print d_height
print d_width
print d_volume

Which in SQL*Plus, with set verify off to remove some cruft, gives:

Enter value for q_length: 3
Enter value for q_height: 4
Enter value for q_width: 5

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.


  D_LENGTH
----------
         3


  D_HEIGHT
----------
         4


   D_WIDTH
----------
         5


  D_VOLUME
----------
        60

SQL>

Curiously that doesn't quite work in SQL Developer (3.1.07 or 3.2.20); the line :d_volume := :d_length * :d_height * :d_width; doesn't assign a value as expected, so it's reported as null. You can do select :d_length * :d_height * :d_width into :d_volume from dual; instead, which makes some sense as they are 'placeholders in SQL statements'. It appears you still can't then reference :d_volume within the block (i.e. it's reported as null if you dbms_output it), but it is shown by print.

BEGIN
    :d_length := &q_length;
    :d_height := &q_height;
    :d_width := &q_width;

    select :d_length * :d_height * :d_width into :d_volume from dual;
    dbms_output.put_line('d_volume inside the block: ' || :d_volume);
END;
/

anonymous block completed
d_volume inside the block: 

D_LENGTH
-
3

D_HEIGHT
-
4

D_WIDTH
-
5

D_VOLUME
--
60

Interestingly, dbms_output.put_line(':d_volume'); shows something like :ZSqlDevUnIq8 in SQL Developer; in SQL*Plus it shows :d_volume.

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