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I want to analyze escape character in my using regex.

For example the regex pattern should match if the string contains character (a) in it but it should not match if the character a is preceded by an apostrophe ('a)

eg:

"a" - true, "aba" - true, "car" - true, "foo" - false, "c'ar" - false

Thanks.

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Please be sure to tag your regex questions with the relevant language. I added the javascript tag for you this time, as per your comment. – Matt Ball Feb 8 '13 at 4:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use negative lookbehind to match only as not preceded by 's.

(?<!')a

Warning: some flavors of regex (JavaScript, Ruby, Tcl) do not support lookbehind.

I would like to have the solution to run in Javascript

Then I will refer you to my boilerplate reference: Mimicking Lookbehind in JavaScript. Alternately, just scan the string yourself, without using regex. This is a pretty easy one, and is quite possibly faster than any lookbehind-mimicking version.

function matches_a_not_preceded_by_apos(str)
{
    var found_an_a = false;
    for (var i=1; i<str.length; i++)
    {

        if (str.charAt(i) === "a")
        {
            found_an_a = true;
            if (str.charAt(i-1) === "'")
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    return found_an_a;
}
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I would like to have the solution to run in Javascript – 123Developer Feb 8 '13 at 4:09
    
@123Developer see my edit. – Matt Ball Feb 8 '13 at 4:21

You can use this pattern:

(?<!\')a

And this is the demo: http://regexr.com?33mue

(?<!\') is the negative look-behind, which says match a if it is not preceded by \'.

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