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Please see this JSFIDDLE

td.rhead { width: 300px; }

Why doesn't the CSS width work?

<table>
<thead>
<tr>
<td class="rhead">need 300px</td>
<td colspan="7">Week #0</td>
<td colspan="7">Week #1</td>
<!-- etc..-->
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="rhead"></td>
<td>S</td><td>M</td><td>T</td><td>W</td><td>T</td><td>F</td><td>S</td>
<td>S</td><td>M</td><td>T</td><td>W</td><td>T</td><td>F</td><td>S</td>
<!-- etc... -->
</tr>
<thead>
</table>

Also, what are the effects of position:fixed, absolute etc have on td widths if any? I am looking for a reason more than a fix. I am hoping to understand how it works.

td width is not 300px as desired

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display: table-cell does not respect width (in the same way that it would not work for display: inline). I don't understand what you are asking about position fixed|absolute –  Explosion Pills Feb 8 '13 at 4:48
    
@ExplosionPills because in my actual code, I have the table set to fixed. As you can guess, I am trying to achieve a timeline at the top of the page. So I just stating in case position attribute affects widths. –  Jake Feb 8 '13 at 4:53

8 Answers 8

up vote 29 down vote accepted

This may not be what you want to hear, but display: table-cell does not respect width and will be collapsed based on the width of the entire table. You can get around this easily just by having a display: block element inside of the table cell itself whose width you specify, e.g

<td><div style="width: 300px;">wide</div></td>

This shouldn't make much of a difference if the <table> itself is position: fixed or absolute because the position of the cells are all static relative to the table.

http://jsfiddle.net/ExplosionPIlls/Mkq8L/4/

EDIT: I can't take credit, but as the comments say you can just use min-width instead of width on the table cell instead.

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3  
+1 - I've used this workaround before. Oddly enough, min-width on the TD does seem to work in Chrome and FF: jsfiddle.net/Mkq8L/7 –  Tim Medora Feb 8 '13 at 5:00
    
Actually, as always, after posting the question, I discover that min-width: 300px works! (@TimMedora you were few secs faster!) –  Jake Feb 8 '13 at 5:00
    
I think the best answer is by mentioning display: table-cell behaviour. Thanks! –  Jake Feb 8 '13 at 5:48

The reason it doesn't work in the link your provided is because you are trying to display a 300px column PLUS 52 columns the span 7 columns each. Shrink the number of columns and it works. You can't fit that many on the screen.

If you want to force the columns to fit try setting:

body {min-width:4150px;}

see my jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Mkq8L/6/ @mike I can't comment yet.

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1  
+1 for discovering that table width threshold increases with body width. –  Jake Feb 8 '13 at 5:51

The reason, is, because you did not specify the width of the table, and your whole bunch of td's are overflowing.

This for example, i've given the table a width of 5000px, which I thought would fit your requirements.

table{
    width:5000px;
}

It is the exact same code you provided, which I merely added in the table width.

I believe what is happening, is because your TD's are way past the default table width. Which you could see, if you pull out about 45 of your td's in each tr, (i.e. the code you provided in your question, not jsfiddle) it works exactly fine

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1  
+1 for mentioning that there is a table width threshold. Problem is sometimes we don't know the overall width before hand. What is the default table width? –  Jake Feb 8 '13 at 5:51
    
I actually don't know. All I know is if you have too many columns, the table will squash up, rendering all child node widths useless. I've encountered this before, but I"m yet to find out the default value. Maybe I should ask that as a question. –  He Hui Feb 8 '13 at 6:49
    
I believe I solved this issue stackoverflow.com/questions/14767459/… –  He Hui Feb 13 '13 at 16:12

My crazy solution.)

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("td").each(function(index) { 
    var htmlText = "<div style='width:300px;'>" + $(this).text() +"</div>";
    $(this).html(htmlText);
  });
});
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Try this it work.

<table>
<thead>
<tr>
<td width="300">need 300px</td>
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You can also use:

.rhead {
    width:300px;
}

but this will only with with some browsers, if I remember correctly IE8 does not allow this. Over all, It is safer to just put the width="" attribute in the <td> itself.

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Test

table{
 table-layout: auto;
}

if you use bootstrap, class table have table-layout: fixed;

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You're better off using table-layout: fixed

Auto is the default value and with large tables can cause a bit of client side lag as the browser iterates through it to check all the sizes fit.

Fixed is far better and renders quicker to the page. The structure of the table is dependent on the tables overall width and the width of each of the columns.

Here it is applied to the original example: JSFIDDLE, You'll note that the remaining columns are crushed and overlapping their content. We can fix that with some more CSS (all I've had to do is add a class to the first TR):

    table {
        width: 100%;
        table-layout: fixed;
    }

    .header-row > td {
        width: 100px;
    }

    td.rhead {
        width: 300px
    }

Seen in action here: JSFIDDLE

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