Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my code so far with some print lines just to make sure it was actually even going into the method. For some reason NOTHING is being drawn on the canvas, I have a program similar to this as far as the drawing goes and it works fine. What is wrong with this one?

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Scanner;
import javax.swing.*;

public class gameOfLife implements ActionListener {
  private int height;
  private int width;
  private Graphics g;
  private JPanel panel;
  private JFrame frame;
  int[][] board= new int[40][40];

  /**
  * @param args
  */
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    gameOfLife gui = new gameOfLife();
  }

  public gameOfLife() {
    int height=400;
    int width=400;
    frame= new JFrame("Keegan's Game Of Life");
    frame.setSize(new Dimension(height,width));
    frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
    frame.setVisible(true);
    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE );
    g=frame.getGraphics();
    drawBoard();
  } 

  public void drawBoard() {
    g.setColor(Color.BLUE);
    g.drawLine(0, 0, 50, 50);
    g.fillOval(50,50,10,10);
    System.out.println("Done Drawing");
    g.drawString("IT WORKED!", 100, 100);
  }

  @Override
  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
  }
}
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

Let's start with g=frame.getGraphics();

This is a very bad idea and not how custom painting is performed. getGraphics may return null and is generally only a snap shot of the last paint cycle. Anything painted to the Graphics context via this method will be destroyed on the next repaint cycle.

You should never maintain a reference to any Graphics context, they are transient and may not be the same object between paint cycles

Instead, create yourself a custom component (something like JPanel) and override it's paintComponent method

Check out Performing Custom Painting for more details

Updated

You can check out this simple example for an idea...

share|improve this answer
    
+1, getGraphics() is evil! –  camickr Feb 8 '13 at 4:59
add comment

You can override paint(Graphics g) in your canvas, otherwise the drawing will disappear once the canvas is invalidated (e.g. moved or covered by another windows).

It might be easier to let your class extends JFrame and override the paint methods, otherwise you can use anonymous class e.g.

frame = new JFrame("Keegan's Game Of Life") { //override paint here }

However, if your application aims to create animation for Game Of Life, you should not be doing this in a JFrame, consider using JPanel or Canvas

share|improve this answer
2  
Overriding paint of top level containers isn't encouraged pratice. Apart from the shire complexity of the paint methods for this containers, they don't provide double buffering support like descendents of JComponent –  MadProgrammer Feb 8 '13 at 4:55
    
This is true, in fact I did not know why the question is using a JFrame directly and not a smaller container e.g. JPanel or a Canvas. –  iTech Feb 8 '13 at 4:57
    
Canvas is a heavy weight component and unless you're intending to use a BufferStrategy of some kind, really shouldn't be mixed with Swing components. The reason the OP isn't using something like this is mostly from a lack of experience (and possibly research) –  MadProgrammer Feb 8 '13 at 5:04
    
Game Of Life animation is not trivial and it might be good to use Canvas with it. In fact, I found few open source implementations for it and they use Canvas –  iTech Feb 8 '13 at 5:09
1  
Didn't say you shouldn't (ever), but you need to have a reason for it. Canvas alone won't help with animation (in fact it would make it flicker). I can give half a dozen links to complex animation I've done for previous question using pure Swing. But you should have a good reason for using it (Canvas), as mixing light and heavy weight components is just...messy...Just pointing it out ;) –  MadProgrammer Feb 8 '13 at 5:12
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.