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I'm trying to write a MSWord macro that will find, and then highlight (in yellow), certain kinds of text strings in a MSWord file.

For example:

1) An italicized comma, followed by whitespace, and then a non-italicized text. Thus, for example:

The second comma in this sentence, which is italicized, should be highlighted by the desired macro. But the comma in this sentence should not be highlighted, because the entire sentence is in italics.



2) A bolded character (of any kind, even whitespace), both preceded and followed by non-bolded characters. Thus, for example:

This sentence ends in a bolded punctuation mark. That first period should be highlighted.

I know that first period might look normal, but it's not. It's bold.


3) Any word that is in SmallCaps, and is >4 letters long, but is not capitalized. I don't know how to do smallcaps in markdown... but imagine for a moment that the following text is in smallcaps in MSWord:

Imagine All of This Is in Small Caps. . . the Word "under" Should Be Highlighted Because It Is More Than Four Characters Long but is not Capitalized



Does anyone know whether this is possible? I know it's quite easy to find text-patterns using regular expressions, but adding changes in formatting to those patterns seems to be tricky.

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migrated from superuser.com Feb 8 '13 at 5:13

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

    
blogs.technet.com/b/heyscriptingguy/archive/2006/07/14/… How Can I Search For (and Reformat) Highlighted Text in a Word Document. –  STTR Feb 7 '13 at 15:52
    
Thanks, but that would seem to be dealing with a slightly different scenario relating to finding highlighted text. My search patterns are a little bit more complicated. –  amitrus Feb 7 '13 at 15:59
    
    
Thanks again for your help. My problem, though, is that regular expressions don't seem to allow for pattern-matching that includes formatting. For example: There is no way, as far as I can tell, to write a regular expression that finds every word whose first character is both capitalized and bolded but the rest of the word is lowercase and non-bold. –  amitrus Feb 7 '13 at 16:38
    
@MarcusChan, thanks. My problem is a bit different than that he one you linked to, I think. I need a way to identify a pattern of text that is identified by a <i>change</i> in formatting. Thus, to provide another example: I would need to find a way to highlight an italicized vowel, followed by a non-italicized consonant. E.g., Th<i>i</i>s i<i>s</i> an <i>e</i>xamp<i>l</i>e. Only "is" and "ex" should match. –  amitrus Feb 7 '13 at 19:59

1 Answer 1

run cmd,

cscript //Nologo regexp02.vbs 

regexp02.vbs:

Dim objRegExp    : Set objRegExp = CreateObject("VBScript.RegExp")
objRegExp.Global = True

Dim input 
input="Imagine All of This Is in Small Caps. . . the Word under Should Be Highlighted Because It Is More Than Four Characters Long but is not Capitalized"

WScript.Echo input

WScript.Echo 

Dim Pattern1 : Pattern1 = "\b[a-z]{5,}\s"
WScript.Echo "Pattern1 : " & Pattern1
WScript.Echo 

objRegExp.Pattern = Pattern1

Set objMatches = objRegExp.Execute(input)

For i=0 To objMatches.Count-1
Set objMatch = objMatches.Item(i)
WScript.Echo objMatch.Value
Next

WScript.Echo 

Dim Pattern2 : Pattern2 = "\b[A-Z]([a-z]{4,})\s"
WScript.Echo "Pattern2 : " & Pattern2
WScript.Echo 

objRegExp.Pattern = Pattern2

Set objMatches = objRegExp.Execute(input)

For i=0 To objMatches.Count-1
    Set objMatch = objMatches.Item(i)
    WScript.Echo objMatch.Value

    WScript.Echo Left(objMatch.Value, 1)

'TODO test bold sumbol Left(objMatch.Value, 1)
'
'   TODO Highlight Code
'

Next

Output:

Imagine All of This Is in Small Caps. . . the Word under Should Be Highlighted Because It Is More Than Four Characters Long but is not Capitalized

Pattern1 : \b[a-z]{5,}\s

under

Pattern2 : \b[A-Z]([a-z]{4,})\s

Imagine
I
Small
S
Should
S
Highlighted
H
Because
B
Characters
C

Regex at VBA:

Open reference

Open reference

Select COM-server Microsoft VBScript Regular Expressions 5.5

Select COM server

VBA code:

Dim objRegExp As New VBScript_RegExp_55.RegExp

objRegExp.IgnoreCase = False
objRegExp.Global = True 

objRegExp.Pattern = Pattern1

Record macro

Record macro

Press Ctrl+F, open search dialog

open search dialog

select font property

select font property

select font style

select font style

Press Find Next

Press Find Next

Stop macro record, open VBA editor

Stop macro record, open VBA editor

Edit macro SearchItalic

Edit macro SearchItalic

Run macro SearchItalic

Run macro SearchItalic

Search italic text:

Sub SearchItalic()

Selection.Find.ClearFormatting
Selection.Find.Font.Italic = True
With Selection.Find
    .Text = ""
    .Forward = True
    .Wrap = wdFindContinue
End With
Selection.Find.Execute
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! But I'm still having trouble with using regexes in conjunction with formatting characteristics. I need a way to select and highlight the first two examples that I provided in my initial post (italicized comma, bolded period). Any thoughts on how that might be possible? –  amitrus Feb 7 '13 at 19:51
    
Add Microsoft VBScript Regular Expressions 5.5 at VBA. Run macros record, edit autocode Alt+F11. –  STTR Feb 7 '13 at 20:07
1  
Thanks again for your help. I'm still unclear as to whether Regular Expressions alone can solve the problem where I'm looking for patterns that involve changes in formatting. See my examples (1) and (2) in my original post for what I mean. –  amitrus Feb 7 '13 at 20:15
    
Regular Expressions - query text only. Use font object and search to change and find text style. –  STTR Feb 7 '13 at 22:01
1  
@nixda I agree with you. Only one problem.) I do not know English)). –  STTR Feb 7 '13 at 22:08

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