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I am trying to understand why adding the brackets in the following example gets a different response. Any explanations would be appreciated

> regexec("\\w*\\.*", "12.3")
[[1]]
[1] 1
attr(,"match.length")
[1] 3

> regexec("[\\w*\\.*]", "12.3")
[[1]]
[1] 3
attr(,"match.length")
[1] 1
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Inside [ and ], the special characters like ., * etc are treated as normal characters and here you have given a regex with a character class enclosing \\w*\\.* which looks for a word character (letter, digit or underscore) or a * or a . (i.e. maximum one character is allowed).

A character class allows the occurrence of any of the characters specified inside it. Here, inside character class, \\w is treated as a \w. \\. is treated as a dot (no special meaning for . here)

Against \\w*\\.* a matching pattern contains zero or more word characters followed by zero or more . and your input is 12.3 which has two digits followed by a dot, causing a match length of 3.

Against [\\w*\\.*] a matching pattern contains any of the following occurring once and only once - word character, *, .

As your input has a digit at the beginning, it is matched. So match length is 1.

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thanks for the clear explanation –  Ricardo Saporta Feb 8 '13 at 5:35
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Brackets create a "character class," which means "match one of any of the listed characters." The first one is "Match 0 or more \w followed by 0 or more periods." The second is "Match one of \w, asterisk, period, or asterisk (redundant)."

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