Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a folder that is filled with .pid files. Each has the PID for a resque worker. How can I kill every PID in that folder from the command line?

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to the docs it says to use:

ps -e -o pid,command | grep [r]esque-[0-9] | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | xargs -L1 kill -s QUIT

Note: That looks them up by name instead of using the .pid files.

Also, the QUIT signal will gracefully kill them. If you want to forcefully kill them use TERM instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I ended up using the god gem (godrb.com) to control my processes like I should have in the first place. –  Sam Baumgarten Feb 23 '13 at 18:29
add comment
cat folder/*.pid | xargs kill

should do it?

If you need to specify a signal, for example KILL, then

cat folder/*.pid | xargs kill -KILL

If your pidfiles lack newlines, this may work better:

( cd folder &&
for pidfile in *.pid; do echo kill -QUIT `cat $pidfile`; done
)
share|improve this answer
    
You'd probably want to use the QUIT signal. According to the docs: "QUIT - Wait for child to finish processing then exit" –  cyfur01 Feb 8 '13 at 5:36
    
The command runs but doesn't seem to do anything. –  Sam Baumgarten Feb 8 '13 at 5:42
    
@SamBaumgarten If you use the TERM signal, it should forcefully stop all the threads. –  cyfur01 Feb 8 '13 at 5:44
    
still doesnt seem to work –  Sam Baumgarten Feb 8 '13 at 5:45
1  
@SamBaumgarten According to the docs it says to use: ps -e -o pid,command | grep [r]esque-[0-9] | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | xargs -L1 kill -s QUIT That looks them up by name instead of using the PIDs. –  cyfur01 Feb 8 '13 at 5:47
show 1 more comment

Run this - with backticks:

kill -9 `cat /path/*.pid`
share|improve this answer
    
When I run this I get a string that has all the pids; however there are no spaces. For example, if the pids are 5220 and 5395. It tries to kill a process with the id 52205395 –  Sam Baumgarten Feb 8 '13 at 5:39
1  
All, so the PID files don't have newlines ... –  hrunting Feb 8 '13 at 5:42
    
Probably Not. I'm just passing it into Resque –  Sam Baumgarten Feb 8 '13 at 5:44
    
Hmmm, interesting. Can you please try this: for i in `ls`; do kill $i; done. –  mtndesign Feb 8 '13 at 5:45
1  
@mtndesign I know this is a tangent (and knit-picky), but using ls for a for loop is a bad idea. @hrunting's loop uses a safer syntax. –  cyfur01 Feb 8 '13 at 6:00
show 3 more comments

Run the command:

kill `cat folder/*.pid`

If the PID files don't have newlines, then the following should work:

for f in folder/*.pid; do kill `cat "$f"`; done
share|improve this answer
    
I'm having the same issue with this as I am with @mtndesign's answer. "When I run this I get a string that has all the pids; however there are no spaces. For example, if the pids are 5220 and 5395. It tries to kill a process with the id 52205395" –  Sam Baumgarten Feb 8 '13 at 5:40
add comment

Leading padding will cause errors. Usesed 's/^ *//g' to remove leading spacing/padding:

ps -e -o pid,command | grep '[r]esque-[0-9]' | sed 's/^ *//g' | cut -d ' ' -f 1 |  xargs -L1 kill -s QUIT
share|improve this answer
    
This is true. If your PIDs loop around and you have PIDs of different length (3 digit vs 4 or 5) the accepted answer will fail and give you all blank PIDs. This would be hard to detect when it does happen so definitely put that sed replace in there! –  Michael Papile Feb 28 at 21:35
add comment

Although the Question is answer but thought that there some many awesome way you can

do some task in linux that what the answer is for exhibiting the power of linux

How abt this

pgrep ruby | xargs ps | grep [r]esque | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9 

NOTE: pgrep is not supported in MAC-OS just thought would be useful to some one

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.