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So I've decided to toy around with Haskell. I am attempting to solve the very first problem on Project Euler. The following is my code:

     euler1 limit (div:divisors) = if limit > 1 then (euler1 limit divisors) + (euler1 limit (div:[])) + (euler1 (limit-1) (div:divisors)) else 0
     euler1 limit (divisor:[]) = if limit > 1 && (mod limit divisor) == 0 then limit else 0
     euler1 limit [] = 0

However, when I run this through ghci, the following happens:

     euler1 9 [3,5]
     *** Exception: <interactive>:3:5-90: Non-exhaustive patterns in function euler1

Further debugging:

     euler1 5 []
     0

     euler1 5 [5]
     *** Exception: <interactive>:3:5-90: Non-exhaustive patterns in function euler1

This suggests that the broken code is in the second case (list with one element), where euler1 does not even contain a recursive step.

Whats going on? Why is it breaking quite so spectacularly? What is the pattern that I've missed? (I've got single element list, multi element list, and empty list no?)

EDIT: For anybody who cares the solution I initially provided above (with John Ls brilliant help) is still not quite right as it will count items which are multiples of more then one divisor more then once. A final, correct, working algorithm is the following:

       euler1 limit (divisor:[]) = if ((limit > 1) && ((mod limit divisor) == 0)) then limit else 0
       euler1 limit (div:divisors) | ((limit > 1) && (euler1 limit (div:[]))==0) = (euler1 limit divisors) + (euler1 (limit-1) (div:divisors)) | ((limit > 1) && (euler1 limit (div:[]))/=0) = (euler1 limit (div:[])) + (euler1 (limit-1) (div:divisors)) |limit > 1 = euler1 (limit-1) (div:divisors) | otherwise = 0
       euler1 limit [] = 0
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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

are you defining this in ghci? If you do:

Prelude> let euler1 limit (divisor:[]) = if limit > 1 && (mod limit divisor) == 0 then limit else 0
Prelude> let euler1 limit [] = 0

the second definition will shadow the first, causing the non-exhaustive pattern failure.

Instead, you should use ghci's multi-line syntax

Prelude> :{
Prelude| let euler1 limit (divisor:[]) = if limit > 1 && (mod limit divisor) == 0 then limit else 0
Prelude|     euler1 limit (div:divisors) = if limit > 1 then (euler1 limit divisors) + (euler1 limit (div:[])) + (euler1 (limit-1) (div:divisors)) else 0
Prelude|     euler1 limit [] = 0
Prelude| :}

Also note that I switched the order of the top two statements. div:divisors will match a single-element list, so you need to check that special case first.

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Thank you! I would have never found this! (I was fairly certain I had some sort of syntax error in my if conditional/mod call) xD –  Abraham P Feb 8 '13 at 7:06
5  
@AbrahamP It's really worth saving your functions in a file, Euler.hs, and doing :l Euler.hs in ghci to load it, much easier than writing directly in ghci. –  AndrewC Feb 8 '13 at 7:44
1  
@AndrewC I agree, that's how I almost always work. But the multi-line notation is very handy in other situations, and it's not widely known, so I took the opportunity to publicize it. –  John L Feb 8 '13 at 8:06
    
@JohnL Oh absolutely - it's very handy indeed. Like. –  AndrewC Feb 8 '13 at 9:03
    
thanks I was having a derp moment with :load and was just using ghci to tinker before I move on to more in depth studies/problems etc (where the ability to space things on lines etc will be absolutely necessary) to kind of wrap my head around syntax et al. But yeah, I've since rewritten it in a file in a somewhat more readable format –  Abraham P Feb 8 '13 at 18:58

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