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I have an apps table with the following structure

app_id VARCHAR(32) NOT NULL, 
dormant VARCHAR(6) NOT NULL, 
user_id INT(10) NOT NULL UNSIGNED

I have two indexes on this table -:

combo1(UNIQUE) - app_id, user_id; 
combo2(INDEX) - app_id, dormant, user_id

I run this query

EXPLAIN SELECT COUNT(user_id), 
      IF(user_id=1,'yes','no') FROM apps 
      WHERE app_id='app_2' AND dormant = 'false'

It outputs the following info -:

id -> 1; 
type -> SIMPLE; 
table -> apps; 
possible_keys -> combo1, combo2; 
key -> combo2; 
key_len -> 34; 
ref -> const; 
rows -> 1; 
Extra -> Using where

But when I run this query

EXPLAIN SELECT COUNT(user_id), 
    IF(user_id=1,'yes','no') 
FROM apps USE INDEX(combo2) 
WHERE app_id='app_2' AND dormant = 'false'

It outputs the following info -:

id -> 1; 
type -> SIMPLE; 
table -> apps; 
possible_keys -> combo2; 
key -> combo2; 
key_len -> 42; 
ref -> const,const; 
rows -> 1; 
Extra -> Using where; Using index

Why is it saying Using index the second time, although it is using the same index in both cases?

share|improve this question
    
you query is actually very confusing, since you expect simultaneously results of an aggregation function and of a simple scalar function. – newtover Feb 8 '13 at 8:30
    
so what should i do @newtover – Ray Z Feb 8 '13 at 8:39
    
what happens when you remove the IF() column? – newtover Feb 8 '13 at 8:47
    
I use the IF function to get the presence of a particular user_id in the returned set. If i remove it, i would have to run two different queries to do the same stuff i m doing in one. By the way with over 100K records, my query is taking 0.071 s to get the result. Is it ok or slow? – Ray Z Feb 8 '13 at 8:55
    
But your current query does not solve that problem. Well it actually does solve it for the particular user_id=1, but it won't work for any other id, and smells very hacky. – newtover Feb 8 '13 at 9:00

From MySQL Documentation:

The column information is retrieved from the table using only information in the index tree without having to do an additional seek to read the actual row. This strategy can be used when the query uses only columns that are part of a single index.

If the Extra column also says Using where, it means the index is being used to perform lookups of key values. Without Using where, the optimizer may be reading the index to avoid reading data rows but not using it for lookups. For example, if the index is a covering index for the query, the optimizer may scan it without using it for lookups.

For more info on this, you can refer this.

share|improve this answer
    
Its a bit confusing. It should not say Using where, cuz i have a covering index. The count(user_id) should be retrieved from the index tree and not from the table itself cuz it is indexed. – Ray Z Feb 8 '13 at 8:18
    
The reason is that you have count() in your query but no group by clause. Again from documentation:"The query contained only aggregate functions (MIN(), MAX()) that were all resolved using an index, or COUNT(*) for MyISAM, and no GROUP BY clause. The optimizer determined that only one row should be returned". Every bit of information is on the link that i have mentioned in answer. – Bhavik Shah Feb 8 '13 at 8:24
    
I got that. Thanks @Bhavik Shah – Ray Z Feb 8 '13 at 8:27

I will answer the question from the comments: how to rewrite the query so that it would work not only for user_id=1:

SELECT
   COUNT(user_id) as distinct_user_count,
   IF(SUM(user_id=@user_id), 'yes', 'no') as is_the_user_found
FROM apps 
WHERE app_id='app_2' AND dormant = 'false';
share|improve this answer

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