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I need python solution.

I have 40-60 images (Happy Holiday set). I need to detect object on all these images.

I don't know object size, form, location on image, I don't have any object template. I know only one thing: this object is present in almost all images. I called it UFO.

Example: enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

As seen in example, from image to image everything changes except UFO. After detection I need to get:

X coordinate of the top left corner

Y coordinate of the top left corner

width of blue object region (i marked region on example as red rectangle)

height of blue object region

share|improve this question
1  
Include some actual images you are working with, otherwise it cannot be solved. – mmgp Feb 9 '13 at 12:54
    
Are those actual pictures from your Happy Holiday set? Or are they for illustration? – YXD Feb 9 '13 at 22:05
    
I'm not fully understanding. You have a set of a few dozen images, all you know is they (almost) all contain the same object somewhere in each frame. However you don't know what the object is or what it looks like, and its appearance may change between images (right/wrong?), but you would like to find out what the object is that is common to all these images and localize it in each frame? – YXD Feb 9 '13 at 22:07
    
I just add more exact examples – Alex Feb 12 '13 at 15:37
up vote 11 down vote accepted

When you have the image data as array, you can use built-in numpy function to do this easily and fast:

import numpy as np
import PIL

image = PIL.Image.open("14767594_in.png")

image_data = np.asarray(image)
image_data_blue = image_data[:,:,2]

median_blue = np.median(image_data_blue)

non_empty_columns = np.where(image_data_blue.max(axis=0)>median_blue)[0]
non_empty_rows = np.where(image_data_blue.max(axis=1)>median_blue)[0]

boundingBox = (min(non_empty_rows), max(non_empty_rows), min(non_empty_columns), max(non_empty_columns))

print boundingBox

will give you, for the first image:

(78, 156, 27, 166)

So your desired data are:

  • top-left corner is (x,y): (27, 78)
  • width: 166 - 27 = 139
  • height: 156 - 78 = 78

I chose that "every pixel with a blue-value larger than the median of all blue values" belongs to your object. I expect this to work for you; if not, try something else or provide some examples where this doesn't work.

EDIT I reworked my code to be more general. As two images, with same shape-color, are not general enough (as your comment indicates) I create more samples synthetically.

def create_sample_set(mask, N=36, shape_color=[0,0,1.,1.]):
    rv = np.ones((N, mask.shape[0], mask.shape[1], 4),dtype=np.float)
    mask = mask.astype(bool)
    for i in range(N):
        for j in range(3):
            current_color_layer = rv[i,:,:,j]
            current_color_layer[:,:] *= np.random.random()
            current_color_layer[mask] = np.ones((mask.sum())) * shape_color[j]
    return rv

Here, the color of the shape is adjustable. For each of the N=26 images, a random background color is chosen. It would also be possible to put noise in the background, this wouldn't change the result.

Then, I read your sample image, create a shape-mask from it and use it to create sample images. I plot them on a grid.

# create set of sample image and plot them
image = PIL.Image.open("14767594_in.png")
image_data = np.asarray(image)
image_data_blue = image_data[:,:,2]
median_blue = np.median(image_data_blue)
sample_images = create_sample_set(image_data_blue>median_blue)
plt.figure(1)
for i in range(36):
    plt.subplot(6,6,i+1)
    plt.imshow(sample_images[i,...])
    plt.axis("off")
plt.subplots_adjust(0,0,1,1,0,0)

Blue shapes

For another value of shape_color (parameter to create_sample_set(...)), this might look like:

Green shapes

Next, I'll determine the per-pixel variability usind the standard deviation. As you told, the object is on (almost) all images at the same position. So the variabiliy in these images will be low, while for the other pixels, it will be significantly higher.

# determine per-pixel variablility, std() over all images
variability = sample_images.std(axis=0).sum(axis=2)

# show image of these variabilities
plt.figure(2)
plt.imshow(variability, cmap=plt.cm.gray, interpolation="nearest", origin="lower")

Finally, like in my first code snippet, determine the bounding box. Now I also provide a plot of it.

# determine bounding box
mean_variability = variability.mean()
non_empty_columns = np.where(variability.min(axis=0)<mean_variability)[0]
non_empty_rows = np.where(variability.min(axis=1)<mean_variability)[0]
boundingBox = (min(non_empty_rows), max(non_empty_rows), min(non_empty_columns), max(non_empty_columns))

# plot and print boundingBox
bb = boundingBox
plt.plot([bb[2], bb[3], bb[3], bb[2], bb[2]],
         [bb[0], bb[0],bb[1], bb[1], bb[0]],
         "r-")
plt.xlim(0,variability.shape[1])
plt.ylim(variability.shape[0],0)

print boundingBox
plt.show()

BoundingBox and extracted shape

That's it. I hope it is general enough this time.

Complete script for copy and paste:

import numpy as np
import PIL
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt


def create_sample_set(mask, N=36, shape_color=[0,0,1.,1.]):
    rv = np.ones((N, mask.shape[0], mask.shape[1], 4),dtype=np.float)
    mask = mask.astype(bool)
    for i in range(N):
        for j in range(3):
            current_color_layer = rv[i,:,:,j]
            current_color_layer[:,:] *= np.random.random()
            current_color_layer[mask] = np.ones((mask.sum())) * shape_color[j]
    return rv

# create set of sample image and plot them
image = PIL.Image.open("14767594_in.png")
image_data = np.asarray(image)
image_data_blue = image_data[:,:,2]
median_blue = np.median(image_data_blue)
sample_images = create_sample_set(image_data_blue>median_blue)
plt.figure(1)
for i in range(36):
    plt.subplot(6,6,i+1)
    plt.imshow(sample_images[i,...])
    plt.axis("off")
plt.subplots_adjust(0,0,1,1,0,0)

# determine per-pixel variablility, std() over all images
variability = sample_images.std(axis=0).sum(axis=2)

# show image of these variabilities
plt.figure(2)
plt.imshow(variability, cmap=plt.cm.gray, interpolation="nearest", origin="lower")

# determine bounding box
mean_variability = variability.mean()
non_empty_columns = np.where(variability.min(axis=0)<mean_variability)[0]
non_empty_rows = np.where(variability.min(axis=1)<mean_variability)[0]
boundingBox = (min(non_empty_rows), max(non_empty_rows), min(non_empty_columns), max(non_empty_columns))

# plot and print boundingBox
bb = boundingBox
plt.plot([bb[2], bb[3], bb[3], bb[2], bb[2]],
         [bb[0], bb[0],bb[1], bb[1], bb[0]],
         "r-")
plt.xlim(0,variability.shape[1])
plt.ylim(variability.shape[0],0)

print boundingBox
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
    
but I don't know before if this object blue or white or red, I don't know its form before. I must analyse all pictures and detect a region which present on all the pictures – Alex Feb 9 '13 at 7:25
1  
Please Adjust your question to reflect this. It is not understandable atm. I will check back tomorrow and give a more general answer.it would be good to have more samples, e.g., a complete set of images. – Thorsten Kranz Feb 10 '13 at 20:05
    
Thanks Thorsten for Your idea and script. I also add more accurate photo examples of what I mean. – Alex Feb 12 '13 at 15:35

I create a second answer instead of extending my first answer even more. I use the same approach, but on your new examples. The only difference is: I use a set of fixed thresholds instead of determining it automatically. If you can play around with it, this should suffice.

import numpy as np
import PIL
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import glob

filenames = glob.glob("14767594/*.jpg")
images = [np.asarray(PIL.Image.open(fn)) for fn in filenames]
sample_images = np.concatenate([image.reshape(1,image.shape[0], image.shape[1],image.shape[2]) 
                            for image in images], axis=0)

plt.figure(1)
for i in range(sample_images.shape[0]):
    plt.subplot(2,2,i+1)
    plt.imshow(sample_images[i,...])
    plt.axis("off")
plt.subplots_adjust(0,0,1,1,0,0)

# determine per-pixel variablility, std() over all images
variability = sample_images.std(axis=0).sum(axis=2)

# show image of these variabilities
plt.figure(2)
plt.imshow(variability, cmap=plt.cm.gray, interpolation="nearest", origin="lower")

# determine bounding box
thresholds = [5,10,20]
colors = ["r","b","g"]
for threshold, color in zip(thresholds, colors): #variability.mean()
    non_empty_columns = np.where(variability.min(axis=0)<threshold)[0]
    non_empty_rows = np.where(variability.min(axis=1)<threshold)[0]
    boundingBox = (min(non_empty_rows), max(non_empty_rows), min(non_empty_columns), max(non_empty_columns))

    # plot and print boundingBox
    bb = boundingBox
    plt.plot([bb[2], bb[3], bb[3], bb[2], bb[2]],
             [bb[0], bb[0],bb[1], bb[1], bb[0]],
             "%s-"%![enter image description here][1]color, 
             label="threshold %s" % threshold)
    print boundingBox

plt.xlim(0,variability.shape[1])
plt.ylim(variability.shape[0],0)
plt.legend()

plt.show()

Produced plots:

Input images Outputs

Your requirements are closely related to ERP in cognitive neuroscience. The more input images you have, the better this approach will work as the signal-to-noise ratio increases.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry if this question is answered by looking at the code, but are you assuming the object will be in the same position for every image? It simplifies the problem a lot if you assume that, I wasn't sure by reading the post if this is the case. – Rui Marques Feb 13 '13 at 19:46
    
Yes, I do. I understood OP this way. – Thorsten Kranz Feb 13 '13 at 21:40
    
Thorsten right. I assume the object will be in the same position for every image (my added photos say about this) . That's what I need. – Alex Feb 14 '13 at 4:03

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