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I have created folders in my root example: http://www.zipholidays.co.uk/Cuba or http://www.zipholidays.co.uk/Florida

When I type http://www.zipholidays.co.uk/cuba (Cube in lowercase), it shows page not found.

I'm using Apache server. People are linking to pages with lowercase, uppercase, mixed case - whatever. What do I do to make the pages case insensitive?

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mod_spelling perhaps? mod_spelling

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4  
your speling of mod_speling is off ;-) – bobince Sep 25 '09 at 12:08
    
This is not a spelling issue. How to treat upper- and lowercase charachers in URL's is a long standing problem in webdevelopment. – Gerrit Sep 25 '09 at 13:24
1  
Spelling issue or otherwise, mod_spelling does address what the OP was asking about, namely miscapitalised urls. – Matthew Scharley Sep 27 '09 at 13:55

If you make your pages case insensitive, you'll have some duplicate content problems as you will have two pages with the same content.

A good solution would be to do some 301 redirect on every 404 page when the equivalent in lowercase exists.

For example in your 404 default page, you put :

<?php
    $lower = strtolower($_SERVER['REQUEST_URL']);
    if (file_exists(PATH_TO_YOUR_APPLICATION . $lower) {
        header('location: ' . $lower, true, 301);
        die();
    }
?>

So when you load a 404 page, if the same url in lower cases exists, you redirect there. Otherwise you can display your own missing page content.

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Just two? Heck, you have cuba, Cuba, CuBa, CubA, CUba, etc, etc... Far more than two pages. – Matthew Scharley Sep 25 '09 at 11:44
    
FYI, this is correct, but just turning on mod_spelling does this, and it Just Works[tm] – Matthew Scharley Sep 25 '09 at 11:48

I wouldn’t make my URLs case insensitive. Instead I would follow a strict guideline for creating such URLs. I would for example only use lowercase URL paths and redirect requests with URL paths with uppercase letters to the lowercase variant.

You can even do that with mod_rewrite (requires rewrite map to internal tolower function):

RewriteCond %{tolower:%{REQUEST_URI}} .+
RewriteRule ^[^A-Z]*[A-Z] %0 [L,R=301]
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Maybe you can replace linux for windows as the server OS.

Apache on Linux is case sensitive in the filepaths, so also in the URI's. Windows file system isn't case sensitive, so it doesn't matter there.

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Why is this answer down voted? Am I technically incorrect, or do you just disagree with my answer? – Gerrit Sep 25 '09 at 13:03
1  
I haven't downvoted you but I think you give a radical solution with a lot of costs only to solve one tiny problem. – netadictos Oct 25 '09 at 14:29
    
The URL path is case sensitive. So /Cuba and /cuba would be considered as different resources. – Gumbo Oct 25 '09 at 14:59

You do not need to do that. Because Google will think that you have duplicate pages on your site, and gonna ban you. It is the rule of SEO science.

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