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Java modulo operator % is based on the truncated division (see Wikipedia: Modulo operation).

  • 5%3 produces 2 (note that 5/3 produces 1)
  • 5%(-3) produces 2 (note that 5/(-3) produces -1)
  • (-5)%3 produces -2 (note that (-5)/3 produces -1)
  • (-5)%(-3) produces -2 (note that (-5)/(-3) produces 1)

In computing science, given two integers a and n, n > 0, sometimes it is useful to get the unique integer r within [a,n[ which is congruent to a modulo n.

Question

Is there an efficient generic operator / method in Java which respects this specification of modulo?

This is to avoid rewriting it in every project where it is needed...

Miscellaneous

I found a lot of questions on stackoverflow about this problem, most of them confusing the different modulo implementations. If you are just troubled about the results of the modulo operation on negative numbers, below are some implementations based on the Java % operator that may be useful.

Common hack

Since we hardly use a negative divisor, this implementation returns the Euclidean or floored modulo when n > 0.

static int mod(int a, int n){    
  return a<0 ? (a%n + n)%n : a%n;
}
  • mod( 5, 3) produces 2
  • mod(-5, 3) produces 1

Euclidean modulo

static int euclideanModulo(int a, int n){
  return n<0 ? euclideanModulo(a, -n) : mod(a, n);
}
  • euclideanModulo( 5, 3) produces 2
  • euclideanModulo(-5, 3) produces 1
  • euclideanModulo( 5,-3) produces 2
  • euclideanModulo(-5,-3) produces 1

Floored modulo

static int flooredModulo(int a, int n){
  return n<0 ? -flooredModulo(-a, -n) : mod(a, n);
}
  • flooredModulo( 5, 3) produces 2
  • flooredModulo(-5, 3) produces 1
  • flooredModulo( 5,-3) produces -1
  • flooredModulo(-5,-3) produces -2
share|improve this question
    
You've probably already checked it out, but you can floor values (nearest integer down) pretty easily with Math.floor() (JavaDocs) – Killrawr Feb 8 '13 at 10:19
2  
@Killrawr Math.floor() is worse than any of the solutions above. – UmNyobe Feb 8 '13 at 10:29
    
@Killrawr a - n * (int)Math.floor((double)a/n); is mathematically correct for the floored modulo, but not efficient, and not generic. – boumbh Feb 8 '13 at 10:30
    
@boumbh which behavior do you want? What should (-5)magicmod(-3) give? -2 or 2? – UmNyobe Feb 8 '13 at 10:38
    
Haha I havent experimented with any of the solutions in the question (to find improvements). But thanks for the clarification anyhow UmNyobe (+1 rep). Usually most of the functions I've found in the Math library are great though like cos/sin/tan/pow/sqrt/log/exp. But I haven't really coded anything with Floor/Ceiling function (sorry I couldn't be much help). – Killrawr Feb 8 '13 at 10:53
up vote 5 down vote accepted
+----+----+-----------+---------+-----------+-----------+---------+-----------+
| x mod y |           quotient 'q'          |          remainder 'r'          |
| x  | y  | truncated | floored | Euclidean | truncated | floored | Euclidean |
+----+----+-----------+---------+-----------+-----------+---------+-----------+
|  5 |  3 |         1 |       1 |         1 |         2 |       2 |         2 |
| -5 |  3 |        -1 |      -2 |        -2 |        -2 |       1 |         1 |
|  5 | -3 |        -1 |      -2 |        -1 |         2 |      -1 |         2 |
| -5 | -3 |         1 |       1 |         2 |        -2 |      -2 |         1 |
+----+----+-----------+---------+-----------+-----------+---------+-----------+

Any of them satisfies at least x = yq + r.

Truncated division and modulo

static int truncatedDiv(int x, int y) {    
    return x / y;
}

static int truncatedMod(int x, int y) {    
    return x % y;
}

Floored division and modulo

You can use methods in java.lang.Math since Java 8. See floorDiv and floorMod.

static int floorDiv(int x, int y) {    
    return Math.floorDiv(x, y);
}

static int floorMod(int x, int y) {    
    return Math.floorMod(x, y);
}

Euclidean division and modulo

a) based on truncated division

import static java.lang.Math.*;

static int euclideanDiv(int x, int y) {
    int r = x / y;
    // if the divident is negative and modulo not zero, round down for positive divisor, otherwise round up
    if (x < 0 && r * y != x) {
        r -= signum(y);
    }
    return r;
}

static int euclideanMod(int x, int y) {
    int r = x - euclideanDiv(x, y) * y;
    return r;
}

b) based on floored division

import static java.lang.Math.*;

static int euclideanDiv(int x, int y) {
    int r = floorDiv(x, y);
    // if the divisor is negative and modulo not zero, round up
    if (y < 0 && r * y != x) {
        r++;
    }
    return r;
}

static int euclideanMod(int x, int y) {
    int r = x - euclideanDiv(x, y) * y;
    return r;
}

c) based on absolute modulo

import static java.lang.Math.*;

static int euclideanMod(int x, int y) {
    int r = abs(x) % abs(y);
    // apply the sign of divident and make sure the remainder is positive number
    r *= signum(x);
    r = (r + abs(y)) % abs(y);
    return r;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Vlastimil, thanks for the good news about Java 8. I have some problems with your implementation. When I tried version a) and version b), euclideanMod(-4, -2) returned 2 instead of 0, and for version c), euclideanModA(5, -3) returned 2 instead of 1. Maybe I did something wrong, could you confirm? – boumbh Mar 30 '15 at 9:31
    
I read your comment, I’m wrong and I need time to make things right. Still you may have a mistake in implementation a) and b)? – boumbh Mar 30 '15 at 9:45
    
No, you are right. The truth is I sent the answer as draft - I didn't expect anyone to test it before next weekend. I wanted "no IFs" alternative to your solution - saying that I was considering removing a) and b) altogether. – Vlastimil Ovčáčík Mar 30 '15 at 17:25
    
@boumbh, I gave up the no IFs idea and just inspired myself with Java 8 source. I would go with Euclidean modulo based on truncated division, as thats the default division in Java. Absolute modulo algorithm is however lot easier to remember. – Vlastimil Ovčáčík Mar 31 '15 at 18:59
    
Hi Vlastimil, I finally tested it. I’m suprised that the truncated version is so fast. I would have thougth that something like int r = x % y; return r >= 0?r:r + Math.abs(y); would be faster because there’s only one division and no multiplication... Your truncate version is the fastest I found for now. – boumbh Apr 7 '15 at 15:11

how about this code

public static int gcd(int p, int q) {
    if(count == 0) 
        System.out.print("Gcd for " + p + " and " + q);
    if (q == 0) {
           System.out.println(" returns " + p + " after " + count + " iterations");
        return p;
    }
    count++;
    return gcd(q, p % q);
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    count = 0;
    gcd(4, 16);
    count = 0;
    gcd(4, 16);
    count = 0;
    gcd(16, 4);
    count = 0;
    gcd(15, 60);
    count = 0;
    gcd(15, 65);
    count = 0;
    gcd(1052, 52);
}
share|improve this answer

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