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Hi I have a program that uses a label called Valve and a textbox called Variable

The gist is that if the Variable = 0 then the label colour is gray, If the Variable = 1 then the label uses a thread which flashes between gray and red.

This works almost perfectly apart from if changing between the two values very quickly (entering 0 then deleting it then entering 1, and so on) Then the thread speed increases (as if it is multi-threading).

The strange thing is that if swapping between the values 0 & 1 slowly (every 2 seconds +), then it doesn't increase the blinking speed (this is what the program needs to do)

This is expanded code from the following question: vb.net multi threading

Note: This is just a VB.NET conversion from my project on VisiWin.NET. In this example the TextBox Variable will be an actual variable read from a PLC and the label Valve will be triangles representing a process solenoid from a process flowsheet mimic. Every solenoid will be controlled by different variables.

Imports Microsoft.VisualBasic
Imports System
Imports System.Collections
Imports System.Collections.Generic
Imports System.Drawing
Imports System.Windows.Forms
Imports System.Threading
Imports System.Diagnostics

Public Class Form1

Private _flash As Boolean = False

Private Sub Variable1_TextChanged(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Variable.TextChanged


    If Variable.Text = "1" And Not _flash Then
        _flash = True
        Dim FlashThread As New Thread(New ThreadStart(AddressOf FlashLabel))
        FlashThread.Start()
    End If

    If Variable.Text = "0" Then
        _flash = False
        Valve.ForeColor = Color.Gray
    End If

End Sub


Private Sub FlashLabel()

    Dim _Color As Color = Color.Gray
    While _flash

        If Valve.ForeColor = _Color Then
            Valve.ForeColor = Color.Red
        Else
            Valve.ForeColor = Color.Gray
        End If
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000)

    End While

End Sub

End Class
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is the following:

  1. You enter 1, _flash is False: The thread is started, changes the color and sleeps 2 seconds
  2. You enter 0 quickly after entering 1, _flash is True: _flash will be set to False.
  3. You enter 1 quickly after entering 0, _flash is False again: A new thread is started.

Now, if steps 2 and 3 happen while the first thread sleeps, you have two running threads. After the first thread is finished sleeping, it will see that _flash is True and will continue running.

share|improve this answer
    
Cheers, I had a feeling that was the issue. Is there any simple solution to it? Or is the variable switching too quick for any additional code to prevent the multi-threading issue? –  Gareth Antony Fowell Feb 8 '13 at 10:41
    
@GarethAntonyFowell: I think the answer by Sean points out what to do to prevent it. I agree with using a Timer instead of a Thread. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 8 '13 at 10:44
    
I have used timers before and yes they proved useful but my project will be much too big and I will have to use hundreds of timers, I want to use a thread to create my own property binding. A normal timer just isn't right for the scale my project. –  Gareth Antony Fowell Feb 8 '13 at 11:35
    
@GarethAntonyFowell: I am pretty sure you don't want all your text boxes to flash independently. One timer for all text boxes should be enough. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 8 '13 at 11:51
    
This is just a VB.NET conversion from my project on VisiWin.NET. In this example the TextBox "Variable" will be an actual variable read from a PLC and the label "Valve" will be triangles representing a process solenoid. Every solenoid will be controlled by different variables. This means I would need to use a timer for every Solenoid / Pump / Motor in my project. –  Gareth Antony Fowell Feb 8 '13 at 12:06

What's happening here is that your first flashing thread is still running, it's just in the two second sleep phase. Your value changes to 0, it doesn't break out of the loop because it's asleep and then the variable changes back to 1 again, the thread wakes up and carries on, by which time you have spawned another thread doing the exact same thing, so it appears as if the thread is going faster.

I would suggest changing this to a timer instead, as you can stop the timer when the variable is 0, and then restart it when it is 1:

Imports Microsoft.VisualBasic
Imports System
Imports System.Collections
Imports System.Collections.Generic
Imports System.Drawing
Imports System.Windows.Forms
Imports System.Threading
Imports System.Diagnostics

Public Class Form1

Private _timer As New System.Windows.Forms.Timer()

Private Sub Variable1_TextChanged(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Variable.TextChanged


    If Variable.Text = "1" And Not _flash Then
        _flash = True
        _timer.Interval = 2000
        _timer.Enabled = True
        _timer.Start()
    End If

    If Variable.Text = "0" Then
        _flash = False
        _timer.Stop()
        _timer.Enabled = False
        Valve.ForeColor = Color.Gray
    End If

End Sub


Private Sub FlashLabel() Handles _timer.Tick

    Dim _Color As Color = Color.Gray

    If Valve.ForeColor = _Color Then
        Valve.ForeColor = Color.Red
    Else
        Valve.ForeColor = Color.Gray
    End If

End Sub

End Class

Docs for Timer: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/system.windows.forms.timer.aspx

Alternatively, you could store the thread in a field and terminate it when your variable is set to 0:

Imports Microsoft.VisualBasic
Imports System
Imports System.Collections
Imports System.Collections.Generic
Imports System.Drawing
Imports System.Windows.Forms
Imports System.Threading
Imports System.Diagnostics

Public Class Form1

Private _flash As Boolean = False
Private _flashThread as Thread

Private Sub Variable1_TextChanged(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Variable.TextChanged


    If Variable.Text = "1" And Not _flash Then
        _flash = True
        _flashThread As New Thread(New ThreadStart(AddressOf FlashLabel))
        _flashThread.Start()
    End If

    If Variable.Text = "0" Then
        _flash = False
        _flashThread.Abort()
        Valve.ForeColor = Color.Gray
    End If

End Sub


Private Sub FlashLabel()

    Dim _Color As Color = Color.Gray
    While _flash

        If Valve.ForeColor = _Color Then
            Valve.ForeColor = Color.Red
        Else
            Valve.ForeColor = Color.Gray
        End If
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000)

    End While

End Sub

End Class

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-GB/library/ty8d3wta.aspx for notes on aborting threads, although I don't think any of this really applies to you, if it doesn't abort the thread during it's sleeping time, it should abort before the next iteration of the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
I have used timers before and yes they proved useful but my project will be much too big and I will have to use hundreds of timers, I want to use a thread to create my own property binding. A normal timer just isn't right for the scale my project. –  Gareth Antony Fowell Feb 8 '13 at 11:36
    
Ok, well you know your project much better than me, however the timer wraps all of this threading up in a way that is likely (not always) better than the way you're doing it. It looks like you're building these manually anyway, perhaps you can wrap this up in a helper class or something and re-use it? It's just a suggestion =] –  Sean Feb 8 '13 at 11:47
    
Helper class? How would I go about making one of these as I don't believe I have used one before. Also how would it help the blinking issue? –  Gareth Antony Fowell Feb 8 '13 at 13:17
    
It wouldn't help with the blinking, this is more of a general design thing. Say you're going to re-use this blinking functionality in many places, you could create a new class called Blinker or something that takes two Colors and a Control as an argument in the constructor. You would then wrap up all the functionality in this one class, giving it Start and Stop methods like a timer. –  Sean Feb 8 '13 at 13:27
    
I get where you are coming from, that way for each solenoid that goes faulty I can call the start or stop from anywhere that I need it. Cheers! –  Gareth Antony Fowell Feb 8 '13 at 13:32

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