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I tried searching a similar question but couldn't find one, although there are a couple with a similar title.

I have code on the host something like this:

handle_error(cudaMalloc((void**)&ret_dev, FLOAT_SIZE*no_kstrings*M));
for(int div=0;div<no_kstrings/threads;div++){
   kernel<<<grid_dim,block_dim>>>(ret_dev, v_freq_vectors, &no_kstrings[threads]);
   handle_error(cudaMemcpy(&exp_freq[threads], ret_dev, FLOAT_SIZE*threads*M, 
        cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost));
}

Basically I have to run the code in the loop as a multiple of the maximum no. of threads per block. And the kernel function just does something and puts data in ret_dev. So I was wondering, do I need to do cudaMemcpy() after each iteration or I can do it outside the loop too? Something like this:

handle_error(cudaMalloc((void**)&ret_dev, FLOAT_SIZE*no_kstrings*M));
for(int div=0;div<no_kstrings/threads;div++){
   kernel<<<grid_dim,block_dim>>>(ret_dev, v_freq_vectors, &no_kstrings[threads]);
}
handle_error(cudaMemcpy(exp_freq, ret_dev, FLOAT_SIZE*no_kstrings*M, 
     cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost));

I guess what I want to ask is, does the call to the kernel function multiple times on the same arguments corrupt those arguments in some way?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Have you reversed the two code samples you posted? – talonmies Feb 8 '13 at 11:07
    
If you are writing data to the same locations of ret_dev, then the next kernel call will overwrite the previous data. So yes, you have to copy data in each iteration. – sgarizvi Feb 8 '13 at 11:07
    
Ok, since I am not writing on the same location in ret_dev, so I don't need to copy it in every iteration, right? – vegeta Feb 8 '13 at 12:13
    
@talonmies: I did try both, and right now I'm seeing identical results, but I was wondering there might be some catch... – vegeta Feb 8 '13 at 12:15
    
@user1961040: I mean that in your question the "outside the loop" code has a memcpy inside the loop and the "inside the loop" has the memcpy outside the loop – talonmies Feb 8 '13 at 12:17
up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you launch a kernel multiple times (or multiple kernels) without specifying a stream, they are queued on the standard stream 0 and executed consecutively. The same accounts for memcpy calls. The order of those kernel and memcpy calls will be preserved. Also, kernel arguments are always passed by value and changing a value later will not corrupt the already scheduled call, even though it is not launched yet.

Whether you can or cannot move the memcpy out of the loop in your case depends on what your kernel does. If all kernels work on their own chunk of data, you should be fine copying back the result after launching all the kernels. In that case, you might want to check if you algorithm needs the global synchronization, because if not you can gain a lot of speed by moving the for loop inside the kernel.

If your kernels work on all the data and you need to save it at specific times, you could still consider allocating an additional result array on the gpu and copy it there inside the kernel. This should also be way faster than doing a memcpy in a loop.

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