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EDIT: This question relates to Java 1.6 (and below). Apologies for not making this clear in the original post.

The hierarchy here shows Java Exception is divided into two types: RuntimeException and not a RuntimeException.

I'm probably missing something but wouldn't it have been better to divide into something like UncheckedException and CheckedException instead? For example, the following statement has quite a few checked exceptions:

try {
    transaction.commit();
} catch (SecurityException e) {
} catch (IllegalStateException e) {
} catch (RollbackException e) {
} catch (HeuristicMixedException e) {
} catch (HeuristicRollbackException e) {
} catch (SystemException e) {
}

Am only really interested in whether it succeeds or fails so would like to deal with the checked exceptions as a group but not the unchecked exceptions as it's not good practice to catch an unexpected error. So with this in mind, maybe I could do something like:

try {
    transaction.commit();
} catch (Exception e) {
    if (e instanceof RuntimeException) {
        // Throw unchecked exception
        throw e;
    }
    // Handle checked exception
    // ...
}

But this seems horribly hacky. Is there a better way?

share|improve this question
3  
Which version of Java are you using? (Java 7 has additional features around this.) –  Jon Skeet Feb 8 '13 at 11:12
    
Oooh - didn't know that! I'm using 1.6. –  Steve Chambers Feb 8 '13 at 11:13
    
Worth noting that Java exceptions are actually divided into not two but three types RuntimeException, Exceptions that are not RuntimeExceptions and Errors. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 8 '13 at 11:15
    
Hmmmm not strictly true as an Error isn't an Exception. –  Steve Chambers Feb 8 '13 at 11:16
1  
Correct, I did not think about that seperation, I'm guessing a more correct thing to say would have been "Java throwables are divided into three parts" –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 8 '13 at 11:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I understood correctly, then you are almost there. Just catch RuntimeException. That will catch RuntimeException and everything under it in the hierarchy. Then a fallthrough for Exception, and you're covered:

try {
    transaction.commit();
} catch (RuntimeException e) {
    // Throw unchecked exception
    throw e;
} catch (Exception e) {
    // Handle checked exception
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Like it. I still wonder why they didn't include a category for "NonRuntimeException" but this does the job. –  Steve Chambers Feb 8 '13 at 11:20
    
Worth noting that this is not the Java way (that is, it is not very Java to catch very general exception types). That said I personally think this is fine and that java got exceptions wrong. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 8 '13 at 11:35

Java 7 allows you such constructions:

try {
    transaction.commit();
} catch (SecurityException | IllegalStateException  | RollbackException | HeuristicMixedException  e ) {
   // blablabla
}

UPD: I think, that there isn't nice and convenient way for doing it in earlier versions of Java. That is why developers of Java language introduced such construction in Java 7. So, you could devise your own approaches for Java 6.

share|improve this answer
    
OP specifically said he is using version 1.6 and not 1.7 –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 8 '13 at 11:13
    
Lovely, I was wondering if something like that existed! Good to know they've improved it in 7 but unfortunately I'm confined to 6. Kind of makes the question redundant though I suppose! –  Steve Chambers Feb 8 '13 at 11:15
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum He said it after I posted my answer. Do you think that I should immediately delete my answer? –  Andremoniy Feb 8 '13 at 11:15
    
@Andremoniy No, I think it's a good answer that will help future users, I made that comment so you'd hopefully add something about the java 1.6 case in it as well. Also, here is a good link illustrating the added functionality in 1.7 docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/language/… –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 8 '13 at 11:17

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