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As per checkpatch.pl script "extern declaration be outside .c file" (used to examine if a patch adheres coding style) Note: this works perfectly fine without compilation warnings The issue is solved by placing the extern declaration in .h file.

a.c
-----
int x;
...

b.c 
----
extern int x;

==>checkpatch complains

a.h
-----
extern int x;

a.c
----
int x;

b.c
---- 
#include "a.h"

==> does not complain

I want to understand why this is better

My speculation. Ideally the code is split into files so as to modularize the code (each file is a module) The interface exported by the module is placed in the header files so that other modules (or .c files) can include them. so if any module wants to expose some variables externally, then one must add an extern declaration in a Header file corresponding to the module.

Again, having a header file corresponding to each module (.c file) seems like to many header files to have.

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It's not really that many, since the implementation of the interface in the header may be split accross many translation units. –  StoryTeller Feb 8 '13 at 11:46
    
"My Sepculation" is correct. That's it. –  Christian Rau Feb 8 '13 at 12:13
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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It would be even better to include the a.h in the a.c file as well. That way the compiler can verify that the declaration and the definition match each other.

a.h
-----
extern int x;

a.c
----
#include "a.h"  <<--- add this
int x;

b.c
---- 
#include "a.h"

The reason for the rule is, as you assume, that we should use the compiler to check what we are doing. It is much better with the tiny details.

If we allow extern declarations all over the place, we get in trouble if we ever want to change x to some other type. How many .c files do we have to scan to find all extern int x? Lots. And if we do, we will likely find some extern char x bugs as well. Oops!

Just having one declaration in a header file, and include it where needed, saves us a lot of trouble. In any real project, x will not be the only element in the header file anyway, so you are not saving on the file count.

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I see two reasons:

  1. If you share a variable, it's because it's not in your own file, so you want to make it clear that it's shared by adding the extern to a header file - that way, there is only one place [the include directory] to search for extern declarations.
  2. It avoids someone making an extern declaration, and then someone else making a different (as in using different type or attributes) extern declaration for the same thing. At least if it's in a header file [that is relevant], all files use the same declaration.
  3. If you ever decide to change the type, there are only two places to change. If you were to add a "c.c" file that also use the same variable, and then decide that int is not good enough, I need long, you'd have to modify all three places, rather than two as you'd have if there was a header file included in each of "a.c", "b.c" and "c.c".

Having a header file for your module is definitely not a bad idea. But it could of course be acceptable, depending on the circumstances to put the extern into some existing headerfile.

An alternative, that is quite often a better choice than using an extern, is to have a getter function, that fetches your variable for you. That way, the variable can be static in its own source file [no "namespace pollution", and the type of the variable is also much more well defined - the compiler can detect if you are trying to use it wrongly.

Edit: I should point out that Linux coding style is the way it is for "good" reasons, but it doesn't mean that code that isn't part of the Linux source code can't break those rules in various ways. I certainly don't write my own code using the formatting of Linux - I like extra { } around single statements, and I (nearly) always put { on a new line, in line with whatever the brace belongs to, and the } in the same column again.

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One reason I always place the extern declarations in the .h is to prevent code duplication, especially if there are, or may be, more bits of code using your "a.c" code and having to access the "x". In that case all files would have to have the extern declaration.

Another reason is that the extern declaration is part of the interface of the module and as such I would keep it, together with any other interface information in the header file.

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Your speculation is right: for maximal code reuse and consistency, the (public) declarations must be put into header files.

Again, having a header file corresponding to each module (.c file) seems like to many header files to have.

Then get used to it. It's a logical concept and a good practice to adapty

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You have got the reason right as to why extern declarations must be placed in a header file. So, that they can be accessed across different translation units easily.

Also, it is not necessary that each .c file should have a corresponding .h file. One .h file can correspond to a decent number of .c files depending upon your module segregation design.

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Again, having a header file corresponding to each module (.c file) seems like to0 many header files to have.

As you have said, the idea of a header file is simple. They contain the public interface that a module wants to export (make available) to other modules (contained in other .c files). This can include structures and types and function declarations. Now, if a module defines a variable which it wants to make available to other modules, it makes sense for it to be included with it's other public parts in the header file. This is why externs end up in th header file. They are just a part of the things that the module wants to make public. Then anyone can include this public interface by simply including the header file.

Having a .h file per .c file may seem like much, but it may be the right thing to do. But keep in mind that a module may implement its code in multiple .c files, and choose to export its aggregate public interface in a single .h file. So, it is not really a strict one to one thing. The real abstraction is that of the public interface offered by a module.

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