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Given ~50,000 records with two datetime fields representing start and end times for each row, how do I write an SQL Server query to build a histogram with buckets of arbitrary time spans between the start and end dates, e.g. 30 minutes, 0-1 hours, 1-2 hours, 2-4 hours, 4-8 hours, 8-24 hours, 24-48 hours, 48-72 hours, 3-5 days, 7+ days?

I'm hoping there is a clever way to avoid executing a query for every bucket (10 in this case). I'm using LINQ-to-SQL as a light ORM, but raw SQL would be fine too.

My naive approach would be to first bucket everything by 60 minutes, then perform a subquery to pull out each irregular bucket.

Edit: Bonus points for the LINQ version since I just learned it is possible to generate CASE statements in LINQ. Any performance considerations between a duration table and CASE statements?

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3 Answers

Try this:

SELECT Periods.Period, SUM(Price)
FROM
(
    SELECT '2013-01-01 10:00:00' AS StartDate, '2013-01-01 10:30:00' AS EndDate, 10 AS Price
    UNION ALL
    SELECT '2013-01-01 09:00:00' AS StartDate, '2013-01-01 10:00:00' AS EndDate, 20 AS Price
    UNION ALL
    SELECT '2013-01-01 11:00:00' AS StartDate, '2013-01-01 13:00:00' AS EndDate, 30 AS Price
    UNION ALL
    SELECT '2013-01-01 13:00:00' AS StartDate, '2013-01-01 15:00:00' AS EndDate, 40 AS Price
    UNION ALL
    SELECT '2013-01-01 10:00:00' AS StartDate, '2013-01-01 13:00:00' AS EndDate, 50 AS Price
) AS Prices
INNER JOIN 
(
    SELECT 1 AS Period
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 2 AS Period
    UNION ALL 
    SELECT 3 AS Period
) AS Periods
ON DATEDIFF(HOUR, Prices.StartDate, Prices.EndDate) < Periods.Period
GROUP BY Periods.Period

In your table you can calculate duration between startdate and enddate, then join it to table with your periods (as I understand - x-axis values) and group by these periods.

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Say you had

SomeTable(Key,StartDate,EndDate)

Select Key,DateDiff(minute,StartDate,EndDate) From SomeTable as RawValue

would give you each key and the minutes difference

so

Select Key,
Case When RawValue < 30 Then "Less than 30 minutes"
Case When RawValue between 30 and 60 then "Less than an hour"
...
else 'Over 7 days' as HistValue
From
(
Select Key,DateDiff(minute,StartDate,EndDate) From SomeTable as RawValue
) RawValues

would give you each key and the range of difference

so

Select HistValue,Count(*) From
(
Select Key,
Case When RawValue < 30 Then "Less than 30 minutes"
Case When RawValue between 30 and 60 then "Less than an hour"
...
else 'Over 7 days' as HistValue
From
(
Select Key,DateDiff(minute,StartDate,EndDate) From SomeTable as RawValue
) RawValues
) UncountedValues

Would you give you the lot in one go, off the top of my head anyway.

If you want a more generic solution then one way is to define a duration table

e.g.

Category        MinMinutes MaxMinutes
"Less than 30"  0         30

Take out the hard coding and do a join

e.g

Inner join Duration On BucketMinutes between MinMinutes and MaxMinutes
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Awesome. I just realised this might be a good fit for a PIVOT query. Would that change the approach? –  pate Feb 8 '13 at 13:21
    
Great idea on having a duration table. I use a Calendar for days/weeks in the same way, but had not thought of a duration table. –  pate Feb 8 '13 at 13:26
    
If you wanted a report instead of a histogram, certainly. Say you had some other grouping category you could pivot round that and end up with the series as a table where rows were the category and the ranges the columns. –  Tony Hopkinson Feb 8 '13 at 14:00
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A linq approach (with just a few intervals to get the idea)

var i30m = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30).TotalMinutes;
var i60m = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(60).TotalMinutes;
var i2h = TimeSpan.FromHours(2).TotalMinutes;

context.Records.Select(t => SqlMethods.DateDiffMinute(t.StartTime, t.EndTime))
      .GroupBy(i => i < i30m
                      ? "0-30 m"
                      : i < i60m
                          ? "30-60 m"
                          : i < i2h
                              ? "1-2 h"
                              : "Long")
      .Select(i => new {i.Key, Count = i.Count()})

SqlMethods provides SQL Server functions for linq to sql.

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