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I do not quite understand the meaning of group patterns. From what I read in the specification, it should not make any difference whether I put graph patterns that are already in a group into a nested group (no UNION or anything like that). There is also an example illustrating this.

Therefore, I don't understand the following behaviour that I am watching on DBpedia:

The following query yields 14 results:

PREFIX ygo: <http://dbpedia.org/class/yago/>

SELECT ?p ?bn ?ya
WHERE {
    ?p rdf:type ygo:AmericanFilmDirectors.
    ?p dbpprop:birthname ?bn.
    ?p dbpprop:yearsActive ?ya.
    FILTER((?ya > 1980) && (regex(?bn, "e"))).
}

Yet, this one yields only 13 for some reason - Shonda Rhimes is missing compared to the other result set:

PREFIX ygo: <http://dbpedia.org/class/yago/>

SELECT ?p ?bn ?ya
WHERE {
    {
        ?p rdf:type ygo:AmericanFilmDirectors.
        ?p dbpprop:birthname ?bn.
        ?p dbpprop:yearsActive ?ya.
    }
    FILTER((?ya > 1980) && (regex(?bn, "e"))).
}

I have tested this with DBpedia's Snorql frontend.

(Strangely, I can reproduce this only sometimes with DBpedia's Virtuoso query frontend ... sometimes, both queries return just 13 results.)

Why is this? Is that a part of the SPARQL specification that I haven't yet understood correctly, or is it a bug in the triple store implementation and the changes from query 1 to query 2 shouldn't make any difference?

share|improve this question
    
DBpedia's sparql service is undoubtedly quirky. It could be a bug, it could be a consequence of measures taken to scale and ration resource use, or it could be a problem with the operation of service. Bug seems unlikely -- how could you get that wrong? -- but the other two are entirely possible. Currently they seem to have issues with their cluster, for example. My advice: treat this service as a 'best effort', don't rely on getting complete answers. –  user205512 Feb 8 '13 at 14:08
    
Oh, and to be clear: your understanding of sparql is perfectly fine. –  user205512 Feb 8 '13 at 14:11
1  
Minor : "and" isn't legal SPARQL, not "," –  AndyS Feb 8 '13 at 15:11
    
@AndyS: looks at specification Whoops, you're right. Thanks for pointing that out. I'll edit the question accordingly once DBpedia is back online. Virtuoso seems to swallow both and and && with the same meaning, but of course I'd like to stay as much standard-conformant as possible. (What do you mean by not ","?) –  O. R. Mapper Feb 8 '13 at 15:17
1  
There should be no , between selected variable names for it to be a legal query –  RobV Feb 8 '13 at 16:58
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While they are different queries then do end up as the same algebra expressions in SPARQL and should produce the same answers. However, depending on data distribution, you may be hitting the internal execution limits in the engine because the pattern could generate a large number of possibilities to be FILTERed. That would explain the different results at different times.

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Accepted because it sufficiently explains what is happening here - thank you. To summarize, my SPARQL code is correct, and this is basically something that with SQL databases we don't take care of because DB engines already optimize the queries, whereas triple stores such as Virtuoso don't do any such optimization yet? –  O. R. Mapper Feb 8 '13 at 15:20
    
Engines do optimise queries. This case may be so trivial they simply haven't bothered with it, the 'optimised' version being simpler to write. –  user205512 Feb 8 '13 at 16:17
    
@user205512: I'm generating my queries based on expression trees that come from a visual representation of the query, and such expression trees could very well contain some nested conjunctions. Hence, checking for that situation and restructuring the expression tree makes my code more complex, not simpler. But, well, as you've all confirmed the syntax is correct in theory, here's hope the optimization by engines will eventually cover such trivial cases as well :-) –  O. R. Mapper Feb 8 '13 at 21:25
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