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Write a function named bitCount() in bitcount.c that returns the number of 1-bits in the binary representation of its unsigned integer argument. Remember to fill in the identification information and run the completed program to verify correctness.

 /*
    Name:
    Lab section time:
  */
  #include <stdio.h>
  int bitCount (unsigned int n);
  int main ( ) {
    printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 0\n",
      0, bitCount (0));
    printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 1\n",
      1, bitCount (1));
    printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 16\n",
      2863311530u, bitCount (2863311530u));
    printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 1\n",
      536870912, bitCount (536870912));
    printf ("# 1-bits in base 2 representation of %u = %d, should be 32\n",
      4294967295u, bitCount (4294967295u));
    return 0;
  }
  int bitCount (unsigned int n) {
    /* your code here */
  }

Can someone help me understand exactly what's that asking? Is bitCount supposed to convert the decimal inputted into binary, and then count the number of 1's?

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There's a whole bunch of ways listed on the Bit Twiddling Hacks page. –  Samuel Audet Feb 8 '13 at 13:44

1 Answer 1

There is no "decimal" input to the function, it's being passed plain (unsigned, it seems) numbers. They will be stored in binary on most typical computers.

I guess it would return these values, for instance:

  • bitcount(0) -> 0 (since 0 has no bits set)
  • bitcount(1) -> 1 (since 1 is 12 in binary)
  • bitcount(2) -> 1 (since 2 is 102 in binary)
  • bitcount(3) -> 2 (since 3 is 112 in binary)

It doesn't matter what base the number is given in in the source code where the function is called, that'll be converted to binary once the program runs. You can call it like bitcount(01) (octal) or bitcount(0x80), it's still just getting an unsigned int whose value can be assumed to be stored in binary.

A recursive algorithm for bitcount(x) is as such:

  1. if x is 0, return 0
  2. if x is 1, return 1
  3. return bitcount(x mod 2) + bitcount(x / 2)

Note that the pseudocode doesn't assume that the number x is stored in any particular way (be it binary or whatever), it works on the number itself. The literals in the pseudocode are in decimal, but that's just notation.

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so how do i access the number in binary? like it gets passed the decimal value, how do I get the binary value? –  user2054534 Feb 8 '13 at 20:30

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