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I have three divs with left, center and right classes and I want to interchange their position and apply new classes as they go to thei new positions. But for some reason it doesn't work This is my script:

$(function() {
            $(".left").css("left","50px");
            $(".center").css("left","300px");
            $(".center").css("width","300px");
            $(".center").css("height","300px");
            $(".center").css("top","25px");
            $(".right").css("left","650px");
            $(".right").click(function(){
                $(".left").animate({
                    left: '650px'
                    }, 1000, function() {
                    });
                $(".center").animate({
                    left: '50px',
                    width: '200px',
                    top: '75px',
                    height: '200px'
                    }, 1000, function() {
                    });
                $(".right").animate({
                    left: '300px',
                    width: '300px',
                    height: '300px',
                    top: '25px'
                    }, 1000, function() {
                    });
                $(".bule").removeClass("left right center");
                $(".second").addClass("left");
                $(".third").addClass("center");
                $(".first").addClass("right");
                $(".bule").removeClass("first second third");
                $(".left").addClass("first");
                $(".center").addClass("second");
                $(".right").addClass("third");
                });
        });

Here is a working example.

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1  
You should reduce the number of recurring seletors to maintain readability and performance. $(".center").css("width","300px").css("height","300px"); or even better $(".center").css({ width: "300px", height: "300px"}); for example. –  Stefan Feb 8 '13 at 13:58
    
@Stefan +1 - always a good idea. –  Colin Morelli Feb 8 '13 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you select elements using a jQuery selector $('...') - the selection is evaluated and the following actions are taken on those elements. If later, you remove a class or change the ID of a selected element, those actions have already been taken - so they will stick. Similarly, they won't automatically inherit actions from other selectors (since they didn't have that class/ID at the time the selection was made).

If you want to bind events once, and have them work when new elements are added, or classes are changed, you need to use a slightly different event syntax:

$('body').on('click', '.right', function() {

});

Notice how the selector is now the body element (since the body element will always exist when this runs). What you are telling jQuery here is to bind a click event to the <body> element, and, when a child of <body> is clicked, evaluate the element against the expression .right. If that expression matches, call my function.

This method takes advantage of javascript event propagation, where events bubble all the way back up to their highest ancestor. This means that clicking on a link inside of a div will trigger a click event for the link, div, and body - in that order.

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Thanks. I'll accept your answer as soon as i can. –  Dan Ovidiu Boncut Feb 8 '13 at 13:51
    
+1 for pedagogical explanation. –  Stefan Feb 8 '13 at 13:59
    
do you know how can i apply easing to my animation? –  Dan Ovidiu Boncut Feb 8 '13 at 14:12
1  
@DanOvidiuBoncut Easing animation is the third parameter to animate $('...').animate(properties, duration, easing, callback). If you're using just jQuery your only options are swing or linear. If you're also using jQuery UI - you can check out some great options here. Just put the name in as a string: $('...').animate({}, 1000, 'easeInOutQuad', function() { }); –  Colin Morelli Feb 8 '13 at 14:14
    
thanks again :D –  Dan Ovidiu Boncut Feb 8 '13 at 14:18

A solution to this problem could be if you moved everything that is currently in the body of DOM ready event handler:

$(function() {

 [...]

});

To a function like

function setup() {
 [...]
}

and then call setup() once in DOM ready event, and also once after the transitions are complete, say in the callback of one of the animate() functions.

So it would look like:

$(function() {
  setup();
});

[...]

$(".right").animate({
   left: '300px',
   width: '300px',
   height: '300px',
   top: '25px'
   }, 1000, function() {
     setup()
});

If the animate() functions had different timings, you'd want to place it in the callback of the one with the longest timing.

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