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I'm learning OO JavaScript, so this question may sound odd. Problem: normalize function should be private, that is not accessible/writable outside. Question: how can I access normalize from inside prepare prototype function?

var AuthHmac = AuthHmac || (function(_, CryptoJS) {
    function AuthHmac(options) {
        var options = options || {},
            normalize = function(s) { return s.toLowerCase(); };

        this.additionalHeaders = options.additionalHeaders || {};
    };

    AuthHmac.prototype.prepare = function(request) {
        request.headers = request.headers || {};

        _.each(this.additionalHeaders, function(value, name) {
            request.headers[this.normalize(name)] = value;
        });
    };

    return AuthHmac;

})(_, CryptoJS);
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't. JavaScript does not have any concept of private or public properties and hence people use closures and scoping as "hack" to simulate privacy. But this comes at a cost, namely that the prototype methods don't have access to these "private" properties.

In your specific example though, normalize could as well be defined outside the constructor function, since it does not depend on anything inside the constructor function:

var AuthHmac = AuthHmac || (function(_, CryptoJS) {

    var normalize = function(s) { return s.toLowerCase(); };

    function AuthHmac(options) {
        var options = options || {};
        this.additionalHeaders = options.additionalHeaders || {};
    };

    AuthHmac.prototype.prepare = function(request) {
        request.headers = request.headers || {};

        _.each(this.additionalHeaders, function(value, name) {
            request.headers[normalize(name)] = value;
        });
    };

    return AuthHmac;

})(_, CryptoJS);
share|improve this answer
1  
I disagree to call lexical scoping and closures a "hack". The cost is trivial too. –  jAndy Feb 8 '13 at 14:28
    
That is, var normalize is a local variable and I can use it from within AuthHmac, right? Any disadvance defining normalize outside the constructor (as you proposed)? –  gremo Feb 8 '13 at 14:29
    
@jAndy: If those concepts are used to simulate private properties, than it is a "hack" IMO (and note that I put hack in quotes. It's a create application of the concepts). –  Felix Kling Feb 8 '13 at 14:29
    
@Gremo: Since normalize does not depend on anything inside the constructor, you might as well just define it outside. –  Felix Kling Feb 8 '13 at 14:29
    
@FelixKling: there is no simulation. it is working as intended. –  jAndy Feb 8 '13 at 14:30

No, not if that normalize function is scoped to the constructor function.

However, since your function does not need to be privileged (i.e. have access to the constructor's local variables), you can easily put it outside and it still will be private to your module:

var AuthHmac = AuthHmac || (function(_, CryptoJS) {

    function normalize(s) { return s.toLowerCase(); }

    function AuthHmac(options) {
        var options = options || {};

        this.additionalHeaders = options.additionalHeaders || {};
    };

    AuthHmac.prototype.prepare = function(request) {
        request.headers = request.headers || {};

        _.each(this.additionalHeaders, function(value, name) {
            request.headers[normalize(name)] = value;
//                          ^^^^^^^^^
//    No `this.`! "private attributes" in JS are variables, not properties
        });
    };

    return AuthHmac;

})(_, CryptoJS);
share|improve this answer
var AuthHmac = AuthHmac || (function(_, CryptoJS) {

function normalize(s) { return s.toLowerCase(); }

function AuthHmac(options) {
    var options = options || {};

    this.additionalHeaders = options.additionalHeaders || {};
};

AuthHmac.prototype.prepare = function(request) {
    request.headers = request.headers || {};

    _.each(this.additionalHeaders, function(value, name) {
        request.headers[normalize(name)] = value;
    });
};

return AuthHmac;

})(_, CryptoJS);
share|improve this answer

Define the normalise function as a named function inside the scope, instead of putting it in a property of your object:

var AuthHmac = AuthHmac || (function(_, CryptoJS) {

  function normalize(s) {
    return s.toLowerCase();
  }

  function AuthHmac(options) {
    var options = options || {};

    this.additionalHeaders = options.additionalHeaders || {};
  };

  AuthHmac.prototype.prepare = function(request) {
    request.headers = request.headers || {};

    _.each(this.additionalHeaders, function(value, name) {
        request.headers[normalize(name)] = value;
    });
  };

  return AuthHmac;

})(_, CryptoJS);
share|improve this answer

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