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We have two threads, Thread2 waits for Thread1 (receiving the messages from it)

class Thread1 .. {
 run() {
   synchronized(this) { some-work; notify(); } 
 }
}

class Thread2 .. {
 run() {
   while(true) {
    synchronized(thread1) {
      ...
      thread1.wait();
      ... 
      println("Got here"); // has received the notify() from Thread1   
    }
   }
 }

}

  1. thread2.start() // thred2 is first to be ready to receive all messages from thread1
  2. thread1.start()

After starting these threads in that sequence, we have the situation when thread2 is waiting for the notify() from thread1, and this will happen in couple of moments - the message "Got here" will be appeared.

But if I put a delay here:

 class Thread2
 run() {
       while(true) {
        sleep(1000);  // the dalay   
        synchronized(thread1) { ..
 }

Then the message 'Got Here' will be never appeared - because thread2 will miss the notify() from thread1 before the sycnronized(thread1) is reached - then we have a situation when Nothing To Wait.

The question is:

1. Are these two lines atomic. Or better say is this gap between these two lines atomic?:

 while(true) {
    // gap
    synchronized(thread1) {..thread.wait() ..} 
 }

2. Or does it mean that we should not put any expression between while() and synchronized block? For example, we could have:

 while(true) {
    int a = 0; a++; 
    synchronized(thread1) {..thread.wait() ..} 

Because it we have those expressions there then we have a risk of 'nothing-to-wait' situation?

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the gap is not atomic (and why not have while inside synchronized?) –  Anton Kovalenko Feb 8 '13 at 14:32
1  
better to use BlockingQueue for this kind of problem or CountDownLatch –  twillouer Feb 8 '13 at 14:33
    
That what I got from official book (SCJP, page 751). and decided to ask –  ses Feb 8 '13 at 14:34
1  
Apart from being liable to missed signals your code is also liable to spurious wakeup. i.e. occasionally wait() may return without a call to notify() –  bowmore Feb 8 '13 at 15:22
    
That's true.But I'm surprised why in SJCP all thread examples use while(condition){synchronized(object) {...;object.wait();...} } if it is liable to missed signals. –  ses Feb 8 '13 at 18:18
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3 Answers 3

wait and notify are not sufficient to create a signalling mechanism, for the reason that you've discovered: if you don't have any waiters, then the notify goes into the bit bucket.

A Semaphore is sufficient: if the sender returns the permit while the receiver is doing something else, then the receiver will immediately get that permit.

But, as some commenters said, a BlockingQueue is a better solution, as it means your code doesn't have to know anything about threading.

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No gap between lines is "atomic", the concept of atomicity does not apply here.

If you want to avoid missing the notify, start thread1 in the body of thread2's run method.

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1  
actually the problem, i guess, is not only in that. i can start thread1 after 1 second when thread2 is already started but still able to have this problem, because of while() –  ses Feb 8 '13 at 14:40
1  
Maybe add a flag to thread1 that indicates whether it has finished its job, and only wait in thread2 if the flag is not set? –  user570500 Feb 8 '13 at 14:57
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Actually, you ask whether this could happen without the sleep(), right? Imho the answer is yes. While the "gap" is just that - nothing - the loop itself consists of actual instructions as well. In between them, the threads can get switched. IMHO it is also not garantueed that you reach Thread2.run before Thread1.run just because you started Thread2 first. I'm not sure how to solve this problem, though. Maybe have Thread1 wait for Thread2 somehow?

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I believe JVM could provide some optimizations or guesses about this. but not sure about this. just hope. –  ses Feb 8 '13 at 14:38
    
i don't exactly know what you mean. –  kutschkem Feb 9 '13 at 20:08
    
I mean, jvm, when compiling, could look at the while(condition) [gap] { synchronized() {..} }, and thinks that if no any expression is present between while and synchronized than assumes that step between while and synchronized is atomic -like as while was inside the synchronized block. I mean no any thread could interrupt the current thread if it is between while and synchronized. –  ses Feb 10 '13 at 17:21
    
No, i think the better solution is just to put the while inside of the synchronized. –  kutschkem Feb 11 '13 at 7:26
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