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For some reason document body right padding does not update properly on display when trying to change padding-right value using JavaScript after page has been loaded. Check out this fiddle which demonstrates the issue.

HTML

<html><body><div></div></body></html>

JavaScript

// Workaround #1: changing right padding without timeout
//$(document.body).css('padding-right', '100px');
setTimeout(function () {
    // This doesn't work properly (at least for me) in Chrome on Ubuntu 12.04
    $(document.body).css('padding-right', '100px');
    // Write info in body that function was executed
    $(document.body).append('timeout function executed');
    // Workaround #2: write content into div
    //$('div').append('timeout function executed');
    // Workaround #3: set document body display to none and back to block via zero ms timeout
    /*$(document.body).css('display', 'none');
    setTimeout(function () {
        $(document.body).css('display', 'block');
    }, 0);*/
}, 1000);

http://jsfiddle.net/gyqEK/2/

There were some workarounds how I was able to make the changes in right padding effective

  • resize browser window
  • switch document body display to none and via zero ms timeout function back to block
  • write some HTML content into a div (in the fiddle example)

I haven't tested this yet on Windows Chrome, but on Ubuntu 12.04 Chrome version 24 I'm able to reproduce this issue. On Firefox this problem doesn't occur. Anyone else facing this same issue and can someone confirm whether this happens on other operating systems and/or Chrome versions too?


Update

I updated a new fiddle which is now closer to the original idea I wanted to achieve. When "something" is done (in this case div is clicked) I wanted document body right padding to change in more or less smooth animation. This works perfectly in Firefox, but couldn't make it work in latest Chrome.

$('div').click(function () {
    var jqBody = $(document.body);
    if (jqBody.css('padding-right') !== '200px') {
        jqBody.animate({
            'padding-right': '200px'
        }, 500);
    } else {
        jqBody.animate({
            'padding-right': '0'
        }, 500);
    }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/gyqEK/5/

Whether it makes sense to change document body right padding or not is another question. My goal was to move all page contents 200 pixels away from right edge in order to reserve some space for absolutely positioned sidebar div element there. I achieved this by wrapping my page content into div element and instead of body padding-right I'm changing the wrapper div elements right margin now. This approach works smoothly also in Chrome.

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1  
Doesn't work on Windows as well. Strange bug! –  Bergi Feb 8 '13 at 14:58

2 Answers 2

It's connected in some way to the page load procedure. You can't really hope to run JQuery successfully unless you know the page is completely loaded. You need to make sure all you Jquery runs after an intial 'ready' event.

If you replace your code with this:

$(document).ready(function(){
    setTimeout(function () {
        $(document.body).css('padding-right', '100px');
        // Write info in body that function was executed
        $(document.body).append('timeout function executed');
       },1000);
});

... it works exactly as intended in Chrome as well as other browsers (tested Firefox and Chrome on Ubuntu 12.04)

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Obviously the 'settimeout()' is also not required, if that was an attempt to 'hack' Chrome into behaving (I've been there ...;-)). I left it in in case there's some functionality you want via the timeout. –  fred2 Feb 8 '13 at 21:50
    
Trying to access elements in jQuery before they've appeared in the code without using $(document).ready() is asking for trouble. All the setTimeouts in the world can't help you now. –  P O'Conbhui Feb 8 '13 at 23:14
    
You can test updated fiddle at jsfiddle.net/gyqEK/4 with "DOM ready" approach, but it still doesn't work for me. I would never rely on timeouts vs. DOM ready in production environment if I need to access DOM elements. Originally I tested $(document).ready() approach, but when it didn't work for me I tested timeout and when that failed too I just left it there. Good point about $(document).ready() though, I appreciate the feedback. –  Perttu Feb 11 '13 at 8:31
    
I also just read that jsFiddle wraps all code written in JavaScript panel into $(window).load() and I verified this by reading the source. So in this case $(document).ready() isn't needed, because all JavaScript code is actually executed later on (after DOM ready) when load event occurs in window. –  Perttu Feb 11 '13 at 8:40
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Someone else stumbled upon the same bug over two years ago and this solution worked for me.

http://stackoverflow.com/a/3485654/1532332

I cannot believe why this hasn't been fixed in Chrome. Anyways, here's an updated fiddle in which the padding animation works also in Chrome. Code could be cleaner, but I'm too lazy to make this tidy :)

$('div').click(function () {
    var jqBody = $(document.body);
    if (jqBody.css('padding-right') !== '200px') {
        jqBody.animate({
            'padding-right': '200px'
        }, {
            duration: 500,
            step: function () {
                this.style.display = 'none';
                this.offsetHeight;
                this.style.display = 'block';
            }
        });
    } else {
        jqBody.animate({
            'padding-right': '0'
        }, {
            duration: 500,
            step: function () {
                this.style.display = 'none';
                this.offsetHeight;
                this.style.display = 'block';
            }
        });
    }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/gyqEK/6/

There's definitely a downside here. In each animation step the element's display is switched to none, offsetHeight is read and display is switched back to block. This causes overhead also for browsers such as Firefox which doesn't have any problems with animating body's padding. In addition, I'm not sure could something like this be used for non-block elements, but I don't need to worry about that in my case.

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