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I'm building an ETL application that uses mongoDB for operational storage. The ETL process performs frequent incremental dumps from data sources and, once in a while, a full table dump.

When I perform a full dump, I want to replace the whole mongoDB collection - indexes and all.

The PHP tutorial suggests this approach for inserting multiple documents:

<?php
$connection = new MongoClient();
$collection = $connection->database->collectionName;

for ( $i = 0; $i < 100; $i++ )
{
    $collection->insert( array( 'i' => $i, "field{$i}" => $i * 2 ) );
}
?>

If I have millions of documents, though, this results in millions of connections to mongoDB - clearly a big bottleneck, especially on a remote DB. Not to mention if I want to wait for a callback from the DB confirming a successful insert.

Is there a method in mongoDB, supported by the PHP driver, to replace a whole collection with a big array, thus performing a single call to the DB? I suppose that would also be faster for mongoDB, such as db.colleciton.drop() vs. db.collection.remove().

If that wasn't possible, would it be more efficient to have a master DB on the same server where the PHP script is run, and have it replicated remotely? This way I could have a faster response from the local DB and just some lag from replication, but I suppose that would make the PHP script available earlier.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

gm

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2  
Have you tried php.net/manual/en/mongocollection.batchinsert.php ? –  user133408 Feb 8 '13 at 15:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I have millions of documents, though, this results in millions of connections to mongoDB

No, only one connection. It doesn't close the connection after each iteration.

Not to mention if I want to wait for a callback from the DB confirming a successful insert.

Indeed there is no easy way around that. If you wanna know something actually inserted you gotta...well, know.

I suppose that would also be faster for mongoDB, such as db.colleciton.drop() vs. db.collection.remove().

Due to the internals of MongoDB and the way it frees record objects ( a good presenation: http://www.10gen.com/presentations/storage-engine-internals ) drop() is more performant in this case since it literally "drops" the collection straight off. Not only that but all of the record object will cease to exist and the collection will just exist as a free extent waiting to be used again.

to replace a whole collection with a big array, thus performing a single call to the DB?

You could always use batchInsert ( http://php.net/manual/en/mongocollection.batchinsert.php ) after dropping a collection. But then you will have oddities if things fail and you will need fall back scenarios. Doing the inserts one by one you can actually judge by single call as to whether things should continue or whether intervention is needed.

Some notes here about indexes, drop your indexes and rebuild them AFTER inserting the data. It is much faster that way.

If that wasn't possible, would it be more efficient to have a master DB on the same server where the PHP script is run, and have it replicated remotely?

It depends. Normally upon the working set as to whether you can actually run MongoDB performantly on your app server. Another consideration is the single point of failure, your secondaries will be distanced and you will be relying on a single mongod on your app server to give you this benefit; so if there is failover your not gonna keep this advantage.

Theorictically there is nothing stopping you from doing this and using RP_PRIMARY and w 1 in MongoClient and replicating the secondaries some time after when the locally hosted mongod has spare time on its hands.

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Thanks for the exhaustive answer! batchInsert() performs faster but, unfortunately, it hits the 16Mb limit... I was hoping that the limit would be for each document, but apparently it is for each insert. –  gattu marrudu Feb 8 '13 at 19:18
    
@gattumarrudu Indeed not any command that takes a query doc like batchinert is limited to 16meg –  Sammaye Feb 8 '13 at 19:23
    
Not clear - do you mean that the 16 Mb limit is valid for any query, or that some types of queries (e.g. batchInsert) can be larger than 16Mb? –  gattu marrudu Feb 8 '13 at 22:44
1  
@gattumarrudu Sorry I realised my English was terrible there. Basically any query document, whether it be through find,findOne or insert or batchinsert can only be 16 meg in length. So batchinsert actually take a document that represents an array of documents so that counts as one query document which means it imposes a limit of 16 meg –  Sammaye Feb 8 '13 at 22:45

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