Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While examining what exception_ptr does, the C++11 standard says (18.8.5/7) that:

Use of rethrow_exception on exception_ptr objects that refer to the same exception object shall not introduce a data race. [ Note: if rethrow_exception rethrows the same exception object (rather than a copy), concurrent access to that rethrown exception object may introduce a data race...

I don't find the case where this weird "Note" applies, since the described effect of rethrow_exception is "Throws: the exception object to which p refers" but 15.1/3, describing the general exception throwing process mandates that "throwing an exception copy-initializes a temporary object, called the exception object."

The weird note would imply that rethrow_exception skips this copy-initialization. But is this really possible?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe it's just moving? –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 8 '13 at 15:06
    
Yup, std::rethrow_exception cannot be implemented using a throw x; expression. (But it's similar to throw;.) –  aschepler Feb 8 '13 at 15:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, it looks like a deficiency in the standard. For a rethrowing throw-expression i.e. throw; without an operand, 15.1p8 says:

A throw-expression with no operand rethrows the currently handled exception. The exception is reactivated with the existing exception object; no new exception object is created. [...]

That is:

#include <exception>
#include <cassert>
int main() {
   std::exception *p = nullptr;
   try {
      try {
         throw std::exception();
      } catch(std::exception &ex) {
         p = &ex;
         throw;
      }
   } catch(std::exception &ex) {
      assert(p == &ex);
   }
}

If the implementation of current_exception copies the currently handled exception object, there's no way to tell whether rethrow_exception copies or not, but if it refers to the exception object then we can check:

#include <exception>
#include <iostream>
int main() {
   std::exception_ptr p;
   try {
      try {
         throw std::exception();
      } catch(...) {
         p = std::current_exception();
         std::cout << (p == std::current_exception()) << ' ';
         std::rethrow_exception(p);
      }
   } catch(...) {
      std::cout << (p == std::current_exception()) << '\n';
   }
}

Every implementation I've tried it on prints 1 1; 0 0 is allowed if current_exception copies; 0 1 is obviously impossible, while the standard in its current state appears to require 1 0. The fix would be for 18.8.5p10 to be clarified with language similar to 15.1p8, either allowing or mandating rethrow_exception to not copy the exception object pointed to by the exception_ptr.

Most Throws: specifications in the standard just name a type (Throws: bad_alloc) or use the indefinite article (Throws: an exception of type ...); the only other exception specifications to use the definite article are those of future::get and shared_future::get, so any resolution should probably address those as well.

share|improve this answer
    
After further investigations, I've found an issue of the LWG proposing to mandate a copy in this case (issue #1369). They appear to have settled against it, confirming how implementations seem to behave. I believe a clarification like the one you propose makes sense, though. –  twicker Feb 8 '13 at 18:23

Yes, it's possible. The exception-handling mechanism already has a copy of the object that was originally thrown, squirreled away in a private memory stash. Typically, exception_ptr is implemented as a smart pointer that manages a reference count for that copy.

As to the general requirements, if a specific requirement conflicts with a general requirement, the specific requirement wins.

share|improve this answer
    
But AFAIK notes are not normative, so rethrowing should create the mandated new copy. –  twicker Feb 8 '13 at 15:17
    
@twicker - you may be right that this isn't correctly specified. <g> exception_ptr was originally a library-only extension, which required extension of the runtime exception support but no language changes. Requiring a new copy would mean requiring a way to store a pointer to the object's copy constructor; while that's technically feasible, it's much simpler to just re-use the old object. And in practice, there's no difference; you might write a copy constructor that records whether it's called, but that aside, it doesn't affect any real-world code. –  Pete Becker Feb 8 '13 at 15:28

When you say throw x;, then the exception object has the same type as x but is a copy.

When you say std::rethrow_exception(p);, the exception object is the actual object which is referred to by the pointer, and no further copies get made.

Thus is several threads concurrently rethrow the same exception pointer (which you are allowed to copy!), then they all have a reference to the same object.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, that makes sense. Still, the standard is confusing when it describes the behavior of rethrow_exception as "Throws: the exception object to which p refers." –  twicker Feb 8 '13 at 15:53
    
@twicker: I think that's pretty clear. There is always a notion of "the exception object", and std::current_exception creates a pointer to that object. –  Kerrek SB Feb 8 '13 at 16:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.