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In the 2008R2 version I was using SSIS logging to a sysssislog table in a defined database. 2012 brings now the concept of Integration Services Catalogs that have their own SSISDB db. Is it still necessary to use the logging to sysssisslog tables or is the information that ends there now somewhere in SSIS DB (what i would expect, since all the reporting for SSIS execution is based on this db as well).

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I know that @jamiet has written about this and normally I would answer with a link to his blog, but I know that he is on SO now so I defer to him to answer. –  William Salzman Feb 8 '13 at 16:04
    
Of course @andy Leonard is also on SO and has blog posts about SSIS logging on 2012. I defer to him to answer. –  William Salzman Feb 8 '13 at 16:04

1 Answer 1

The logging you are familiar with remains available to you with the 2012 release of SQL Server. That said, database logging no longer has to be explicitly defined in your package if you are using the Project Deployment model (SSISDB).

Out of the box, you'll get Basic logging level when you run a package. The other options are none, performance and verbsose. Read more about how to set these and other execution parameters via MVP Phil Brammer. Matt Masson of the actual SSIS team points out what events those levels correspond to in his post on What Events are Included in the SSIS Catalog Log Levels.

Finally, SSIS Reporting Pack is an open source project from MVP Jamie Thomson that provides different insight into the basic data being captured in the new integration services catalog.

My thoughts: necessary no. But if you already have a framework built out culling data from that log (we use it for an alerting system), you are supported to keep using it. If you run integration services packages from multiple servers, there is no functionality to combine the logging from all those disparate SSISDB catalogs to provide insight into your entire universe. You can get that if you all the packages log to a centralized server using the classic technique.

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