Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The situation is: I must use ManagementBaseObject to run a batch file and get its return value (like, 0 if the commands were properly executed, 1 if something went wrong). I've tried to use "EXIT" command to set an errorlevel code, but no matter what I put as the exit code, the "returnValue" property is always 0. Is there any way to make the batch file affect that property?
here is the code (instead of calling the batch file I am just executing a simple command line to make it simpler to post here, but the idea is the same):

ManagementClass processClass =  new ManagementClass("Win32_Process");
try
{
    ManagementBaseObject inp = processClass.GetMethodParameters("Create");
    inp["CommandLine"] = @"cmd /c exit /B 1";
    ManagementBaseObject outp;
    outp = processClass.InvokeMethod("Create", inp, null);
    Console.WriteLine(outp["returnValue"]);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
}

...but the output is always 0! What I wanted to see is 1, which is what I put as the exit code. Is it possible to do that?
I know I "could" use the Process class to make it work, but using ManagementBaseObject was the only way I could find to run a batch file on a remote machine.

To give a little bit of context:
I have this batch file located on a remote machine and I must run that file from my local machine. I am currently using the classes ManagementScope and ConnectionOptions to connect to the remote machine providing my credentials. After that, I create a ManagementClass associated with the remote connection, with ManagementPath set as "Win32_Process". Then, I use ManagementBaseObject to run the batch file and get its return value.
If anyone knows any other way to do this please let me know, I'm open to suggestions.
Thanks!

share|improve this question

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.