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How to check whether the retransmission timer is running or not in linux tcp kernel?

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Do you mean the timer could NOT run? I didn't know – Davide Berra Feb 8 '13 at 16:27
    
No I didnt mean that. There are several timers in TCP. Retransmission timer is one of that and probably the most used one, this is supposed to be running when there are outstanding packets. However, if the first packet of a burst is being sent and there are no outstandings, this timer is not running, it will be set right after the packet is sent. I am interested to know about any particular flag in the kernel that shows if the timer is running. Thanks. – Timir Feb 10 '13 at 9:22

You could set up two hosts: a sender and a receiver. Set up a connection between the two and send some traffic, say transferring a large file. Sniff traffic on both sides.

While traffic is being sent set up a firewall rule to drop some packets, here's an example that randomly drops x%:

# for randomly dropping 10% of incoming packets:
iptables -A INPUT -m statistic --mode random \ 
         --probability  0.1 -j DROP

cleanup:

# for the incoming packets:
iptables -D INPUT -m statistic --mode random \
         --probability 0.1 -j DROP

If you look at your capture you should see that the sender sent packets multiple times to overcome the ones that were dropped. This shows that retransmission is working.

If you pump the drop up to 100% you'll see retransmissions that are only due to timeout.

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Thanks. I am interested to check if the retransmission timer is running in the kernel level, any particular flag (e.g. in the interconnect_sock structure). – Timir Feb 10 '13 at 9:25
    
*inet_connection_sock – Timir Feb 10 '13 at 9:34
    
love that statistic module – bryan_basho Mar 26 '15 at 19:43

It is bound to be running otherwise it is not an implementation of TCP. See the RFC.

One would imagine that by now that somebody had noticed that part of the system is not working.

As to tuning it - see the configuration parameters under /proc/sys/net/ipv4

share|improve this answer
    
There are several timers in TCP. Retransmission timer is one of that and probably the most used one, this is supposed to be running when there are outstanding packets. However, if the first packet of a burst is being sent and there are no outstandings, this timer is not running, it will be set right after the packet is sent. I am interested to know about any particular flag in the kernel that shows if the timer is running. – Timir Feb 10 '13 at 10:47
    
The timer is bound to be running - it is a part of the TCP protocol. – Ed Heal Feb 10 '13 at 10:49
    
Sure, but if there is not packets outstanding, retransmission timer is not running. – Timir Feb 10 '13 at 10:55
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I solved the problem and I guess I should share the solution. In short, when an ACK is received, retransmission timer is turned off by calling inet_csk_clear_xmit_timer. icsk_pending is a flag within inet_connection_sock structure. This flag is unset when an ACK for the earliest outstanding data is received and consequently retransmission timer is turned off. From the linux 3.7 kernel

static inline void inet_csk_clear_xmit_timer(struct sock *sk, const int what)
 {
         struct inet_connection_sock *icsk = inet_csk(sk);

         **if (what == ICSK_TIME_RETRANS || what == ICSK_TIME_PROBE0) {
                 icsk->icsk_pending = 0;**
 #ifdef INET_CSK_CLEAR_TIMERS
                 sk_stop_timer(sk, &icsk->icsk_retransmit_timer);
 #endif
         } else if (what == ICSK_TIME_DACK) {
                 icsk->icsk_ack.blocked = icsk->icsk_ack.pending = 0;
 #ifdef INET_CSK_CLEAR_TIMERS
                 sk_stop_timer(sk, &icsk->icsk_delack_timer);
 #endif
         }
 #ifdef INET_CSK_DEBUG
         else {
                 pr_debug("%s", inet_csk_timer_bug_msg);
         }
 #endif
 }
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