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On my MainViewModel, I have a property that looks like this:

private bool _IsSkinNight = true;
    public bool IsSkinNight
    {
        get { return _IsSkinNight; }
        set 
        {
            _IsSkinNight = value;

            RaisePropertyChanged("IsSkinNight");
            RaisePropertyChanged("WindowBackColor");
            RaisePropertyChanged("StyleImage");
        }
    }

As you can see, I use this one property to raise other properties. It makes changing the UI much easier. Especially as I am going to add more items to it.

However, I have a property on a WPF page that I need to update as well. But since it's on a different page, its ViewModel is separate as well. So this property can't call RaisePropertyChanged on it and the property in the page can't check the state of IsSkinNight.

So what would be the best way to cross between the different ViewModels? I'll be adding more pages. So is there a way to make like a universal property that all ViewModels can access?

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

Even if I don't like using it, you probably need to look up for EventAgregators.

Basically you will be able to fire an event in your MainViewModel, and in your other view models you will be able to register to one or more event of this agregator.

However, I strongly recommend that you use it very lightly, because it can become extremely difficult to Debug, since there is no call stack when you fire an event like that.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for the help everyone. I did a bit more research, based on the suggestions here, and came across MVVM Messages.

Using this blog post, I was able to use MVVM messages to achieve my goal. Thanks again.

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In such a case, I sometimes create a kind of Context class, to keep track of "global" properties. This class has to be registered as a Singleton.

public class SkinContext : ISkinContext {
    private bool _IsSkinNight = true;
    public bool IsSkinNight
    {
        get { return _IsSkinNight; }
        set 
        {
            _IsSkinNight = value;

            RaisePropertyChanged("IsSkinNight");
            RaisePropertyChanged("WindowBackColor");
            RaisePropertyChanged("StyleImage");
        }
    }

then I inject this class in each ViewModel that needs to be aware of the context and subscribe to the NotifyPropertyChanged event (Or a custom event that you created):

public class SomeViewModel {
    public SomeViewModel(ISkinContext context){
        context.OnPropertyChanged += (s,e) => { /*Raise other notification and whatnot*/ }
    }
}
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Thanks, Roel. But, how will the SkinContext class be able to call RaisePropertyEvent within the IsSkinNight property? –  ernest Feb 8 '13 at 17:22
    
I'm not sure I understand your question. The SkinContext can raise whatever event you want, and each ViewModel which has a reference to this SkinContext can subscribe to these event. It's the same principle as an EventAggregator, but it is a little bit easier to see what is going on imo –  Roel Feb 11 '13 at 9:08

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