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I'm somewhat confused about multiprocessing. I'm a 3 years Python programmer, however never really needed to perform tasks in parallel (not just asynchronously). But what I know, or thought to know, is that when using the multiprocessing module in Python to achieve "real parallelism", new python.exe processes are spawned!

A 3D software like Cinema 4D for example uses the power of all CPUs available to render a 3D scene. But I don't see multiple Cinema 4D.exe processes in the Task Manager.

  1. Am I correct with the statement above, that multiple Python processes are spawned when using the multiprocessing module?
  2. If so, why is it, and how can the C++ application use all CPUs without multiple processes?
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's also possible to use multiple CPUs by running multiple threads in the same process. That's just not what the Python multiprocessing module does.

There is a threading module in Python. Unfortunately in CPython, threads aren't as useful as you might think because they all contend on the so-called "Global Interpreter Lock". So they're a lot less parallel in Python than they are in many other languages. If you use threads, you need to worry about what operations in your code will really be parallel. If you use processes you don't (although you might worry about other things, like sharing data).

I don't know whether not or alternative implementations of Python have the same issue with the GIL. But unless you're writing code specifically for Jython/IronPython/whatever, the limitations of CPython apply to your program...

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Am I correct with the statement above, that multiple Python processes are spawned when using the multiprocessing module?

Yes, that is correct. Python needs to spawn new processes (running additional interpreters) to operate in parallel. That is because the GIL(GlobalInterpreterLock) allows only for one execution-thread per interpreter.

If so, why is it, and how can the C++ application use all CPUs without multiple processes?

Well, presumably there is no such thing like a GIL in Cinema4D -- therefore it can execute several threads in parallel.

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Typically, you'd run multiple THREADS, not multiple PROCESSES. There are many advantages to running threads rather than processes. The main advantage is that all the memory belonging to the process is shared between threads, where you'd have to set up some sort memory sharing protocol to share (some part of) the data between different processes.

Both Python and C++ support mulithreading, but as mentioned elsewhere, the python code can't run on multiple processors. It is however useful for doing things in "semi-parallel" (I used python threads to read a file and play it on the soundcard, and at the same time record and save another file, whilst at the same time issuing other commands on the serial port to control the equipment "under test").

The Python module multiprocessing is indeed for using multiple separate processes, which helps "break the python interpreter lock".

In general, running in separate processes is more useful if you want the code to be completely independent from the other tasks running in the system, and doesn't have to share [much] data between the processes - for example calculating very large prime numbers would be a good thing to do in an independent process [I mean the ones with a few hundred thousand or more digits] - the process runs on its own with no other input for hours and hours on end, and it only needs a small amount of input that doesn't change - the "prime number candidate".

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