Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In controller A, I load a model not associated with this controller. I'm interested in managing the model name of controller B with a single variable, so I don't have to manually change many lines if the table/model B's name changes.

For example below is the controller A's code:

public $modelBName = 'ModelB';

public function controller_a_function() {
    $this->loadModel($this->modelBName);    // I use the variable here for model B

    $this->ModelB->model_b_function();    // COMMENT #1
}

Question: For the line commented "COMMENT #1," how do I use the variable name instead of explicitly written out word 'ModelB'? This line appears multiple times throughout the code, and I would like to use the variable $modelBName if possible. ModelB will likely not change, but if it does for some reason, it would be nice to just change one variable instead of editting multiple lines.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The simple answer; use this:

$this->{$this->modelBName}->find('all');

Note the curly brackets {} around the property name. more information can be found in the manual;

http://php.net/manual/en/language.variables.variable.php

A cleaner approach may be a sort of 'factory' method;

/**
 * Load and return a model
 *
 * @var string $modelName
 *
 * @return Model
 * @throws MissingModelException if the model class cannot be found.
 */
protected function model($modelName)
{
    if (!isset($this->{$modelName})) {
        $this->loadModel($modelName);
    }

    return $this->{$modelName};
}

Which can be used like this;

$result = $this->model($this->modelBName)->find('all');
debug($result);

And, if you don't want to specify the model, but want it to return a '$this->modelBName' automatically;

/**
 * Load and return the model as specified in the 'modelBName' property
 *
 * @return Model
 * @throws MissingModelException if the model class cannot be found.
 */
protected function modelB()
{
    if (!isset($this->{$this->modelBName})) {
        $this->loadModel($this->modelBName);
    }

    return $this->{$this->modelBName};
}

Which can be used like this:

$result = $this->modelB()->find('all');
debug($result);
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, the curly brackets work. I wondering, though, if this is a good and common practice? I have not seen anyone else's code that does this. They always just do $this->ModelName->someFunction wherever they need to use a model. Any idea? – musicliftsme Feb 11 '13 at 17:48
    
If you use the regular '$uses' array, the model will already be loaded and you don't have to manually load the model. I don't really see an advantage in using a variable for the modelname. IMO it will even make it less 'obvious' which model you're currently working on. E.g. Calling $this->User->save() is a lot clearer than $this->{$this->modelName}->save(); – thaJeztah Feb 11 '13 at 20:00
    
I'm currently just using loadModel('model_name') in the controller actions if they need it instead of using the $uses array because not every action needs the entire set of models being used in the controller. I think I will go with readability on this one and take your suggestion. – musicliftsme Feb 11 '13 at 21:16
1  
Also, If models already have a relation between them, you don't have to load them separately. E.g. If User->hasmany->Posts, you only have to add 'User' to the $uses array, and call $this->User->Post->something() if needed. However, if you only need a model for a single action, it's also possible to initiate a model like this: ClassRegistry::init('SomeModel')->someMethod(); this way the Model won't be 'attached' to the Contoller, just initialised. – thaJeztah Feb 11 '13 at 21:24

I think you are confused between model name and table name. You can set a model to use a different database table by using the $useTable property, for example:

class User extends AppModel {

    public $useTable = 'users_table'; // Database table used

}

class Product extends AppModel {

    public function foo() {
         $this->loadModel('User');

         $this->User->find('all');
    }
}

You should never need to change the name of the model, and if the name of the database table changes you can simply update the $useTable property in the model.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks for the response. I see that I did get the terms confused, but I have fixed my post. I'm basically looking to use a variable for the model B's name, ModelB, instead of writing it out in the COMMENT #1 line. – musicliftsme Feb 8 '13 at 18:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.