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I'm planning to build an Android application. In this app the users must be able to communicate each other when they are close (a priori fixed distance). I think that the easiest way to implement this model is with a server-client architecture where every message goes from a client to the central server and then the server will forward the message to the target client.

CLIENT A ---M---> SERVER ---M---> CLIENT B

But this way the the system doesn't scale and, in a scenario with a lot of Clients, the Server will become the bottleneck.

I'd like to ask what are the alternatives (on Android) to allow two smartphones to communicate and exchange message in a bidirectional way when they are close to each other.

CLIENT A ---> CLIENT B    CLIENT C ---> CLIENT D
CLIENT A <--- CLIENT B  

For example, is it possible, assuming a distance small enough, a solution based on Bluetooth? Or it is possible open a TCP/UDP socket between the two devices?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use NFC (if the device has it) to pair the devices via Bluetooth or WiFi Direct. If you don't have NFC, simple Bluetooth pairing without it should still work, NFC just makes it convenient.

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I have used this server solution, and it's pretty awesome: http://www.rabbitmq.com/

RabbitMQ is a messaging service with a pretty awesome interface for Android.

I can't speak as to how you would implement either bluetooth or TCP/UDP.

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